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Guidebook for Edinburgh

Raffaele

Guidebook for Edinburgh

Essentials
For food and house shopping
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Tesco Metro
94 Nicolson St
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For food and house shopping
For food and house shopping
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Lidl
56-58 Nicolson St
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For food and house shopping
Food Scene
Relaxed coffee hangout with comfy sofas and rustic wooden tables, serving panini, soups and snacks. Great for breakfast and coffee breaks.
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Kilimanjaro Coffee
104 Nicolson St
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Relaxed coffee hangout with comfy sofas and rustic wooden tables, serving panini, soups and snacks. Great for breakfast and coffee breaks.
Best Italian piazza in town. The award-winning La Favorita is one of the best pizzerias in Britain. With wood-fire oven cooked pizzas and gourmet pastas La Favorita is THE place in town to enjoy the authentic taste of an Italian pizzeria in contemporary surroundings – with a warm and welcoming team to look after you.
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La Favorita
331-325 Leith Walk
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Best Italian piazza in town. The award-winning La Favorita is one of the best pizzerias in Britain. With wood-fire oven cooked pizzas and gourmet pastas La Favorita is THE place in town to enjoy the authentic taste of an Italian pizzeria in contemporary surroundings – with a warm and welcoming team to look after you.
Best Indian Restaurant in town. Situated near the city centre, Kebab Mahal has been serving it's loyal customers for over 30 years. Specialising in halal Indian traditional tandoori and curry dishes, we also run a thriving kebab and pizza takeaway into the early hours. Scottish Curry Awards Winner 2009 Kebab Mahal won First Place in the Scottish Curry Awards 2009 sponsored by Irn Bru! Specialists in Traditional Indian Tandoori Cuisine Kebab Mahal opened back in 1979. The Takeaway Menu features a fine selection of traditional tandoori, curries and kebabs, and is what brings people back to our restaurant regularly and continues to create new customers today.
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Kebab Mahal
7 Nicolson Square
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Best Indian Restaurant in town. Situated near the city centre, Kebab Mahal has been serving it's loyal customers for over 30 years. Specialising in halal Indian traditional tandoori and curry dishes, we also run a thriving kebab and pizza takeaway into the early hours. Scottish Curry Awards Winner 2009 Kebab Mahal won First Place in the Scottish Curry Awards 2009 sponsored by Irn Bru! Specialists in Traditional Indian Tandoori Cuisine Kebab Mahal opened back in 1979. The Takeaway Menu features a fine selection of traditional tandoori, curries and kebabs, and is what brings people back to our restaurant regularly and continues to create new customers today.
Kanpai is an award-winning restaurant At Kanpai they provide top quality traditional Japanese cuisine and service for you to experience. They had long been regarded as one of the finest traditional Japanese restaurants here in Edinburgh. They won the Newcomer of The year in the Scottish Restaurant Awards 2012 against 4000 competitors across Scotland. Kaipai Sushi's most recent awards and features include: AA rosette for the third consecutive year, Michelin Guide 2014, The List, Hitlist 2014. One may choose to dine at the intimate sushi bar or the open kitchen counter to observe how your sushi is made. Private room available for booking.
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Kanpai Sushi
8-10 Grindlay St
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Kanpai is an award-winning restaurant At Kanpai they provide top quality traditional Japanese cuisine and service for you to experience. They had long been regarded as one of the finest traditional Japanese restaurants here in Edinburgh. They won the Newcomer of The year in the Scottish Restaurant Awards 2012 against 4000 competitors across Scotland. Kaipai Sushi's most recent awards and features include: AA rosette for the third consecutive year, Michelin Guide 2014, The List, Hitlist 2014. One may choose to dine at the intimate sushi bar or the open kitchen counter to observe how your sushi is made. Private room available for booking.
Homemade sweet treats, light bites and specialty teas in a time-warp tea shop with chintzy decor. Clarinda’s Tearoom is a fabulous place for food and refreshments in the Canongate. When you step inside, you must adhere to the rules from the start! Considering this is a prime tourist hang out with such close proximity to the Palace, it can be busy all year round, but certainly always busy at weekends. At peak tourist times there can be queues out the door. It’s definitely kitsch inside – full of various decorations, fancy tea pots and plates on the walls, flowery tablecloths and a mixture of tables and chairs.
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Clarinda's Tearoom
69 Canongate
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Homemade sweet treats, light bites and specialty teas in a time-warp tea shop with chintzy decor. Clarinda’s Tearoom is a fabulous place for food and refreshments in the Canongate. When you step inside, you must adhere to the rules from the start! Considering this is a prime tourist hang out with such close proximity to the Palace, it can be busy all year round, but certainly always busy at weekends. At peak tourist times there can be queues out the door. It’s definitely kitsch inside – full of various decorations, fancy tea pots and plates on the walls, flowery tablecloths and a mixture of tables and chairs.
Right next to Bruntsfield Links, the friendly, laid-back Treehouse Café is well located for a fresh, filling sit-in lunch, or a picnic to take out onto the grass. Expect generous portions of no-nonsense, fresh and delicious food at surprisingly reasonable prices. Things start early with creamy scrambled eggs and smoked salmon or freshly made American pancakes for breakfast, and there’s daily changing soup, stack-em-high club sandwiches and stuffed-full toasties for lunch. Come in as a Treehouse newbie and you’ll leave feeling like one of the regulars.
The Treehouse Café
44 Leven St
Right next to Bruntsfield Links, the friendly, laid-back Treehouse Café is well located for a fresh, filling sit-in lunch, or a picnic to take out onto the grass. Expect generous portions of no-nonsense, fresh and delicious food at surprisingly reasonable prices. Things start early with creamy scrambled eggs and smoked salmon or freshly made American pancakes for breakfast, and there’s daily changing soup, stack-em-high club sandwiches and stuffed-full toasties for lunch. Come in as a Treehouse newbie and you’ll leave feeling like one of the regulars.
Opened in 1995, The Elephant House has established itself as one of the best tea and coffee houses in Edinburgh. Made famous as the place of inspiration to writers such as J.K. Rowling, who sat writing much of her early novels in the back room overlooking Edinburgh Castle.
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The Elephant House
21 George IV Bridge
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Opened in 1995, The Elephant House has established itself as one of the best tea and coffee houses in Edinburgh. Made famous as the place of inspiration to writers such as J.K. Rowling, who sat writing much of her early novels in the back room overlooking Edinburgh Castle.
WHISKI is a stunning multi award winning whisky bar and Scottish restaurant on the Royal Mile, full of character and with a brilliant atmosphere. WHISKI's all day dining bar and restaurant serves the best of fresh Scottish food using the best local produce, has over 300 malt whiskies and a great selection of cocktails, great ranfe of whisky, wines and local beers. Come and join us at Whiski for delicious fresh Scottish seafood, Scottish beef, venison, and our famous award winning haggis all featuring on the menu. We cater for large groups, see our groups set menus for further details. LIVE Scottish Music 7 nights a week.
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Whiski Bar & Restaurant
119 High St
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WHISKI is a stunning multi award winning whisky bar and Scottish restaurant on the Royal Mile, full of character and with a brilliant atmosphere. WHISKI's all day dining bar and restaurant serves the best of fresh Scottish food using the best local produce, has over 300 malt whiskies and a great selection of cocktails, great ranfe of whisky, wines and local beers. Come and join us at Whiski for delicious fresh Scottish seafood, Scottish beef, venison, and our famous award winning haggis all featuring on the menu. We cater for large groups, see our groups set menus for further details. LIVE Scottish Music 7 nights a week.
Lush decor in a 16th-century building creates intimate mood for stylish Scottish fine dining.
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Angels with Bagpipes
343 High St
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Lush decor in a 16th-century building creates intimate mood for stylish Scottish fine dining.
Laid-back eating using fresh, seasonal produce in split-level space with Castle views. Bit more expensive but lovely food and great views. Book ahead.
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The Outsider Restaurant
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Laid-back eating using fresh, seasonal produce in split-level space with Castle views. Bit more expensive but lovely food and great views. Book ahead.
Informal Indian dining with a tapas concept in a bustling, spacious two-level eatery with takeaway. Book ahead as always busy.
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Mother India's Cafe
3-5 Infirmary St
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Informal Indian dining with a tapas concept in a bustling, spacious two-level eatery with takeaway. Book ahead as always busy.
Creative, farm-to-fork food, plus craft beers and cocktails in eccentric, gardening-themed cafe-bar.
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St Andrews Brewing Co. Potterrow
32-34 Potterrow
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Creative, farm-to-fork food, plus craft beers and cocktails in eccentric, gardening-themed cafe-bar.
Lavish, Gothic-style dining room and guest suites with roll-top baths in quirky boutique hotel. The most expensive restaurant in Edinburgh, but a little secret: Lunch Menu is ONLY £18.95!!! Try the Secret Garden to be amazed. Famous actors and people dine here often.
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The Witchery by the Castle
352 Castlehill
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Lavish, Gothic-style dining room and guest suites with roll-top baths in quirky boutique hotel. The most expensive restaurant in Edinburgh, but a little secret: Lunch Menu is ONLY £18.95!!! Try the Secret Garden to be amazed. Famous actors and people dine here often.
Best Italian pizza in town
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Pizza Posto Edinburgh
16 Nicolson St
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Best Italian pizza in town
Arts & Culture
FRINGE Venue for more festival fun
Assembly Roxy
2 Roxburgh Pl
FRINGE Venue for more festival fun
FRINGE Venue for more festival fun
ZOO Southside
117 Nicolson St
FRINGE Venue for more festival fun
FRINGE Venue for more festival fun
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Underbelly
56 Cowgate
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FRINGE Venue for more festival fun
FRINGE Venue for more festival fun
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Pleasance
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FRINGE Venue for more festival fun
FRINGE Venue for more festival fun
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Pleasance
60 Pleasance
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FRINGE Venue for more festival fun
FRINGE Venue for more festival fun.
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Pleasance
60 Pleasance
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FRINGE Venue for more festival fun.
For cultural events and a nice coffee shop. It is also a Festival FRINGE venue.
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Summerhall
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For cultural events and a nice coffee shop. It is also a Festival FRINGE venue.
This recently refurbished but still appealingly eccentric palace of wonder is a mad dash through the history of the world and everything in it — both natural and man-made. More than 800 objects make up the mind-boggling installation that is the Window on the World in the Grand Gallery, but I always first pay a visit to the utterly charming, completely barmy Lewis Chessmen. There are interactive galleries to keep children of all ages happy, free tours and Family Footprint Trails to make exploration more exciting. When it all gets a bit much, stop for a giant scone in the Balcony Café, treat yourself to lunch or tea in the glamorous (and correspondingly pricey) rooftop Tower Restaurant; or take the lift from the 5th floor to the 7th to visit the charming but little-visited roof garden for a moment of peace and a surprising city panorama (open 10am-4pm).
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Национальный музей Шотландии
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This recently refurbished but still appealingly eccentric palace of wonder is a mad dash through the history of the world and everything in it — both natural and man-made. More than 800 objects make up the mind-boggling installation that is the Window on the World in the Grand Gallery, but I always first pay a visit to the utterly charming, completely barmy Lewis Chessmen. There are interactive galleries to keep children of all ages happy, free tours and Family Footprint Trails to make exploration more exciting. When it all gets a bit much, stop for a giant scone in the Balcony Café, treat yourself to lunch or tea in the glamorous (and correspondingly pricey) rooftop Tower Restaurant; or take the lift from the 5th floor to the 7th to visit the charming but little-visited roof garden for a moment of peace and a surprising city panorama (open 10am-4pm).
The distinctive crown spire of this great church marks the historic heart of The Royal Mile. Despite the ponderous piers supporting the tower of the much-altered but essentially Gothic High Kirk of Edinburgh, the soaring interior of this ancient church is flooded with light. Stained glass only came to this ‘Cradle of Presbyterianism’ in the late 19th century – Reformation leader John Knox would have been very unhappy to see the colourful window in the south wall dedicated to him. Everyone loves the carved angel playing the bagpipes in the exquisitely detailed Thistle Chapel, still used by the 16 Knights of the Most Noble Order of the Thistle. If you have a head for heights, take the new guided rooftop tour (must be booked in advance – stgilestour@gmail.com, £6 per person). In any case, look out for the volunteer guides who will answer your questions, show you around and tell you some fascinating stories.
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St Giles' Cathedral
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The distinctive crown spire of this great church marks the historic heart of The Royal Mile. Despite the ponderous piers supporting the tower of the much-altered but essentially Gothic High Kirk of Edinburgh, the soaring interior of this ancient church is flooded with light. Stained glass only came to this ‘Cradle of Presbyterianism’ in the late 19th century – Reformation leader John Knox would have been very unhappy to see the colourful window in the south wall dedicated to him. Everyone loves the carved angel playing the bagpipes in the exquisitely detailed Thistle Chapel, still used by the 16 Knights of the Most Noble Order of the Thistle. If you have a head for heights, take the new guided rooftop tour (must be booked in advance – stgilestour@gmail.com, £6 per person). In any case, look out for the volunteer guides who will answer your questions, show you around and tell you some fascinating stories.
Often overlooked, this triple-spired West End cathedral — Scotland’s largest — was designed by George Gilbert Scott. A celebration of Victorian Gothic Revival, it perhaps surprisingly has unashamedly modern stained glass by Sir Eduardo Paolozzi, one of the founders of British Pop Art. Highly recommended, especially for the heavenly Phoebe Anna Traquair murals in the Song School which have recently been restored. There are free guided tours of the Song School and the murals in August; at other times they can be seen by appointment.
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St Mary's Cathedral
35 Manor Pl
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Often overlooked, this triple-spired West End cathedral — Scotland’s largest — was designed by George Gilbert Scott. A celebration of Victorian Gothic Revival, it perhaps surprisingly has unashamedly modern stained glass by Sir Eduardo Paolozzi, one of the founders of British Pop Art. Highly recommended, especially for the heavenly Phoebe Anna Traquair murals in the Song School which have recently been restored. There are free guided tours of the Song School and the murals in August; at other times they can be seen by appointment.
Cultural indigestion isn’t an issue at this manageably-sized gallery housing the national collection of fine art. Old Masters, a good selection of Impressionists and Post-Impressionists and a proudly comprehensive collection of Scottish art — including Scotland’s favourite painting, The Reverend Robert Walker Skating on Duddingston Loch — are on show, as well as world-class temporary exhibitions. Originally two buildings, the galleries are now connected by the sleek Gardens Entrance overlooking Princes Street Gardens. You can shop, eat and attend free 45-minute lunchtime lectures. Try to catch the 'Inspiring Impressionism: Daubigny, Monet and Van Gogh' exhibition, the first major international exhibition of the work of 19th-century landscape painter Charles François Daubigny (from June 25 to October 2, 2016. £11; concession £9). A useful free Gallery Bus runs between the Scottish National Gallery and the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art.
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Шотландский национальный музей современного искусства
75 Belford Rd
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Cultural indigestion isn’t an issue at this manageably-sized gallery housing the national collection of fine art. Old Masters, a good selection of Impressionists and Post-Impressionists and a proudly comprehensive collection of Scottish art — including Scotland’s favourite painting, The Reverend Robert Walker Skating on Duddingston Loch — are on show, as well as world-class temporary exhibitions. Originally two buildings, the galleries are now connected by the sleek Gardens Entrance overlooking Princes Street Gardens. You can shop, eat and attend free 45-minute lunchtime lectures. Try to catch the 'Inspiring Impressionism: Daubigny, Monet and Van Gogh' exhibition, the first major international exhibition of the work of 19th-century landscape painter Charles François Daubigny (from June 25 to October 2, 2016. £11; concession £9). A useful free Gallery Bus runs between the Scottish National Gallery and the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art.
Scotland's national collection of modern art occupies two notable buildings unimaginatively re-named Modern One and Modern Two. They are set in beautiful grounds containing Charles Jencks’ extraordinary Landform and sculptures by Henry Moore. Cubist, Expressionist, post-war and contemporary art are well represented, although I could easily spend all my time looking at the fascinatingly chaotic recreation of Scottish artist Eduardo Paolozzi’s studio in Modern Two. You may wish to linger in the Café Modern One's garden terrace, or the more formal Café Modern Two, which serves a particularly good afternoon tea under the steely gaze of a seven-metre-tall sculpture of Vulcan. An exhibition of Scottish artist Joan Eardley's paintings will run from October 15, 2016 to February 19, 2017 (£9; concession £7). A useful free Gallery Bus runs between the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art and the Scottish National Gallery.
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Шотландский национальный музей современного искусства
75 Belford Rd
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Scotland's national collection of modern art occupies two notable buildings unimaginatively re-named Modern One and Modern Two. They are set in beautiful grounds containing Charles Jencks’ extraordinary Landform and sculptures by Henry Moore. Cubist, Expressionist, post-war and contemporary art are well represented, although I could easily spend all my time looking at the fascinatingly chaotic recreation of Scottish artist Eduardo Paolozzi’s studio in Modern Two. You may wish to linger in the Café Modern One's garden terrace, or the more formal Café Modern Two, which serves a particularly good afternoon tea under the steely gaze of a seven-metre-tall sculpture of Vulcan. An exhibition of Scottish artist Joan Eardley's paintings will run from October 15, 2016 to February 19, 2017 (£9; concession £7). A useful free Gallery Bus runs between the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art and the Scottish National Gallery.
A cosy new name for two very grand buildings — Register House and New Register House — that are the user-friendly repository of Scottish people's past. If you are curious about your Scottish ancestry, the free two-hour taster sessions are a compelling introduction. You will receive instruction and assistance, but be warned, it’s an additive pastime. Further searches can be carried out for a daily fee, and you can pay for assisted searches. Take a break in the smart café or better still, a wander in the lovely Archivists’ Garden, cleverly designed in apparently random patterns to represent the way the brain looks and memory works. Even if you think have little interest in genealogy, you will find yourself curiously moved by the experience.
ScotlandsPeople Centre
2 Princes St
A cosy new name for two very grand buildings — Register House and New Register House — that are the user-friendly repository of Scottish people's past. If you are curious about your Scottish ancestry, the free two-hour taster sessions are a compelling introduction. You will receive instruction and assistance, but be warned, it’s an additive pastime. Further searches can be carried out for a daily fee, and you can pay for assisted searches. Take a break in the smart café or better still, a wander in the lovely Archivists’ Garden, cleverly designed in apparently random patterns to represent the way the brain looks and memory works. Even if you think have little interest in genealogy, you will find yourself curiously moved by the experience.
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Шотландский национальный музей современного искусства
75 Belford Rd
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The Fruitmarket Gallery is a contemporary art gallery in Edinburgh, Scotland. It is located in the centre of the city on Market Street, beside Edinburgh Waverley train station. The gallery, which opened in 1974, is located in a building which was originally built as a fruit and vegetable market in 1938. In 1994, the building was renovated by Richard Murphy Architects to assume its current form. It has a café which is well used and a bookshop which stocks art, architecture, design and photography books and magazines, along with a range of books for children. Recent exhibitions have included international artists such as Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller, Trenton Doyle Hancock, Cai Guo-Qiang, Alex Hartley and Roman Signer. Scottish contemporary artists are also well represented in the exhibit programme by the likes of Callum Innes, Christine Borland, Nathan Coley, Louise Hopkins and Lucy Skaer. With the exhibitions, there is a wide range of learning lectures, events and programmes for visitors.
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The Fruitmarket Gallery
45 Market St
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The Fruitmarket Gallery is a contemporary art gallery in Edinburgh, Scotland. It is located in the centre of the city on Market Street, beside Edinburgh Waverley train station. The gallery, which opened in 1974, is located in a building which was originally built as a fruit and vegetable market in 1938. In 1994, the building was renovated by Richard Murphy Architects to assume its current form. It has a café which is well used and a bookshop which stocks art, architecture, design and photography books and magazines, along with a range of books for children. Recent exhibitions have included international artists such as Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller, Trenton Doyle Hancock, Cai Guo-Qiang, Alex Hartley and Roman Signer. Scottish contemporary artists are also well represented in the exhibit programme by the likes of Callum Innes, Christine Borland, Nathan Coley, Louise Hopkins and Lucy Skaer. With the exhibitions, there is a wide range of learning lectures, events and programmes for visitors.
Drinks & Nightlife
Cool pub with great atmosphere and cinema in the back room.
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Brass Monkey
14 Drummond St
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Cool pub with great atmosphere and cinema in the back room.
It is one of the most traditional Scottish pub.
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Captains Bar
4 S College St
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It is one of the most traditional Scottish pub.
One of the most traditional Scottish pub with traditional live Scottish music.
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The Royal Oak
1 Infirmary St
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One of the most traditional Scottish pub with traditional live Scottish music.
Best music venue for live music in Edinburgh.
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The Jazz Bar
1 Chambers St
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Best music venue for live music in Edinburgh.
The Queen's Hall is a 900-capacity music venue, situated on Clerk Street in Edinburgh, Scotland. Originally built in 1823 as Hope Park Chapel, it was converted to its current role in 1979 and was formally opened by Queen Elizabeth II on 6 July 1979. The Queen's Hall offers a wide range of events to tempt you all year round - classical, jazz, blues, pop, rock, world, folk and comedy. During the summer months it hosts events for the Edinburgh International Festival, Edinburgh Festival Fringe and the Edinburgh Jazz & Blues Festival. It can accommodate everyone from a string quartet or a full symphony orchestra, to a full touring rock band and still maintain the excellent natural acoustics of the Hall. With its well-stocked bar open before and during all concerts, it'll quench your thirst and set you up for the great performance ahead.
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The Queen's Hall
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The Queen's Hall is a 900-capacity music venue, situated on Clerk Street in Edinburgh, Scotland. Originally built in 1823 as Hope Park Chapel, it was converted to its current role in 1979 and was formally opened by Queen Elizabeth II on 6 July 1979. The Queen's Hall offers a wide range of events to tempt you all year round - classical, jazz, blues, pop, rock, world, folk and comedy. During the summer months it hosts events for the Edinburgh International Festival, Edinburgh Festival Fringe and the Edinburgh Jazz & Blues Festival. It can accommodate everyone from a string quartet or a full symphony orchestra, to a full touring rock band and still maintain the excellent natural acoustics of the Hall. With its well-stocked bar open before and during all concerts, it'll quench your thirst and set you up for the great performance ahead.
Sightseeing
The Royal Mile (Scots: Ryal Mile) is the name given to a succession of streets forming the main thoroughfare of the Old Town of the city of Edinburgh in Scotland. The thoroughfare, as the name suggests, is approximately one Scots mile long and runs downhill between two significant locations in the history of Scotland, namely Edinburgh Castle and Holyrood Palace. The streets which make up the Royal Mile are (west to east) Castlehill, the Lawnmarket, the High Street, the Canongate and Abbey Strand. The Royal Mile is the busiest tourist street in the Old Town, rivalled only by Princes Street in the New Town.
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Royal Mile
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The Royal Mile (Scots: Ryal Mile) is the name given to a succession of streets forming the main thoroughfare of the Old Town of the city of Edinburgh in Scotland. The thoroughfare, as the name suggests, is approximately one Scots mile long and runs downhill between two significant locations in the history of Scotland, namely Edinburgh Castle and Holyrood Palace. The streets which make up the Royal Mile are (west to east) Castlehill, the Lawnmarket, the High Street, the Canongate and Abbey Strand. The Royal Mile is the busiest tourist street in the Old Town, rivalled only by Princes Street in the New Town.
Edinburgh Castle is a historic fortress which dominates the skyline of the city of Edinburgh, Scotland, from its position on the Castle Rock. Archaeologists have established human occupation of the rock since at least the Iron Age (2nd century AD), although the nature of the early settlement is unclear.
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Edinburgh Castle
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Edinburgh Castle is a historic fortress which dominates the skyline of the city of Edinburgh, Scotland, from its position on the Castle Rock. Archaeologists have established human occupation of the rock since at least the Iron Age (2nd century AD), although the nature of the early settlement is unclear.
The shore area of Leith, also known as port of Edinburgh, is a centre for a range of new pubs and seafood restaurants in charming surroundings.
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The Shore Restaurant
3 Shore
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The shore area of Leith, also known as port of Edinburgh, is a centre for a range of new pubs and seafood restaurants in charming surroundings.
Whether you consider it an over-priced blot on the landscape or an architectural triumph, Catalonian architect Enric Miralles’ controversial but award-winning building at the bottom of The Royal Mile will always start a debate. You can buy parliamentary shortbread in the gift shop or have a coffee while playing spot the politician in the Parliament Café. There is a permanent exhibition about the Scottish Parliament, free guided tours (booking recommended) are on offer, and, if you are keen to see politics in action, you can book tickets to attend committee meetings or debates. Possibilities are complicated by whether or not Parliament is sitting, so it is best to check the website if you are planning a visit.
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Scottish Parliament Building
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Whether you consider it an over-priced blot on the landscape or an architectural triumph, Catalonian architect Enric Miralles’ controversial but award-winning building at the bottom of The Royal Mile will always start a debate. You can buy parliamentary shortbread in the gift shop or have a coffee while playing spot the politician in the Parliament Café. There is a permanent exhibition about the Scottish Parliament, free guided tours (booking recommended) are on offer, and, if you are keen to see politics in action, you can book tickets to attend committee meetings or debates. Possibilities are complicated by whether or not Parliament is sitting, so it is best to check the website if you are planning a visit.
Only a ten-minute walk from Princes Street and almost entirely sufficient unto itself, Stockbridge is the kind of neighbourhood we all wished we lived in. Cosier and more domestic than the New Town, it nevertheless has some deliciously pretty streets and squares. There is a great choice of fantastic (and unusual) shops, galleries, cafés, bars and restaurants; lovely Inverleith Park with the west gate of the Royal Botanic Gardens just across the road; the Water of Leith to walk by; and more hairdressers than I have ever seen in one place in my life. Spend an hour or two having a wander, then settle in for a drink and a meal, or shop and eat your way round the Sunday market - and remember to bring a bag or two for all the good things you’ll find to take home.
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Stockbridge
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Only a ten-minute walk from Princes Street and almost entirely sufficient unto itself, Stockbridge is the kind of neighbourhood we all wished we lived in. Cosier and more domestic than the New Town, it nevertheless has some deliciously pretty streets and squares. There is a great choice of fantastic (and unusual) shops, galleries, cafés, bars and restaurants; lovely Inverleith Park with the west gate of the Royal Botanic Gardens just across the road; the Water of Leith to walk by; and more hairdressers than I have ever seen in one place in my life. Spend an hour or two having a wander, then settle in for a drink and a meal, or shop and eat your way round the Sunday market - and remember to bring a bag or two for all the good things you’ll find to take home.
Almost everyone knows the story of Bobby, the faithful little dog who remained by his master’s grave for 14 years. His statue is at the top of Candlemaker’s Row, opposite the gates of Greyfriars, the first reformed church in Scotland. The kirk, museum and shop are open from April to October, with volunteer guides to show visitors around, but be sure to check the website calendar as sometimes they are closed for special events. Next to the church is (apparently) the most haunted graveyard in Edinburgh, complete with bad-tempered poltergeist — visitors report fainting or being scratched, bruised or bitten. Most people visit on ghost tours, but during the day I find Greyfriars' churchyard a lovely place just to sit, gazing at the remains of the medieval Flodden Wall and wondering if I know anyone who would look good in a wimple.
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Greyfriars Bobby's Bar
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Almost everyone knows the story of Bobby, the faithful little dog who remained by his master’s grave for 14 years. His statue is at the top of Candlemaker’s Row, opposite the gates of Greyfriars, the first reformed church in Scotland. The kirk, museum and shop are open from April to October, with volunteer guides to show visitors around, but be sure to check the website calendar as sometimes they are closed for special events. Next to the church is (apparently) the most haunted graveyard in Edinburgh, complete with bad-tempered poltergeist — visitors report fainting or being scratched, bruised or bitten. Most people visit on ghost tours, but during the day I find Greyfriars' churchyard a lovely place just to sit, gazing at the remains of the medieval Flodden Wall and wondering if I know anyone who would look good in a wimple.
Leith is an independent place. It officially merged with Edinburgh only in 1920, with most locals very much against the idea. Still a working port, it has always had a Jekyll and Hyde character — imposing merchants’ houses mixed with Dickensian tenements, warehouses and sailors’ dives. Notorious for crime and infamous for its red light district, Leith has moved up in the world since its Trainspotting days. Now it is home to Michelin-starred restaurants, boutique hotels, smart bars and new galleries. But despite the respectability conferred by the recent addition of the Royal Yacht Britannia at Ocean Terminal and the Scottish Government at Victoria Quay, it is still rough enough round the edges to make things interesting. Visit the Trinity House Maritime Museum at the foot of Leith Walk, before continuing along Constitution Street to the Shore where you are sure to find the perfect bar or café.
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Leith
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Leith is an independent place. It officially merged with Edinburgh only in 1920, with most locals very much against the idea. Still a working port, it has always had a Jekyll and Hyde character — imposing merchants’ houses mixed with Dickensian tenements, warehouses and sailors’ dives. Notorious for crime and infamous for its red light district, Leith has moved up in the world since its Trainspotting days. Now it is home to Michelin-starred restaurants, boutique hotels, smart bars and new galleries. But despite the respectability conferred by the recent addition of the Royal Yacht Britannia at Ocean Terminal and the Scottish Government at Victoria Quay, it is still rough enough round the edges to make things interesting. Visit the Trinity House Maritime Museum at the foot of Leith Walk, before continuing along Constitution Street to the Shore where you are sure to find the perfect bar or café.
One of Scotland’s best preserved castles, Craigmillar Castle was a handsome and comfortable noble seat. It was close to the political cauldron of Edinburgh, but separate from it. This helps explain why it became a favoured royal retreat, famously used as a safe haven by Mary Queen of Scots.
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Craigmillar Castle
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One of Scotland’s best preserved castles, Craigmillar Castle was a handsome and comfortable noble seat. It was close to the political cauldron of Edinburgh, but separate from it. This helps explain why it became a favoured royal retreat, famously used as a safe haven by Mary Queen of Scots.
The Scott Monument is a Victorian Gothic monument to Scottish author Sir Walter Scott. It is the largest monument to a writer in the world. It stands in Princes Street Gardens in Edinburgh, opposite the Jenners department store on Princes Street and near to Edinburgh Waverley Railway Station, which is named after Scott's Waverley novels.
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Scott Monument
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The Scott Monument is a Victorian Gothic monument to Scottish author Sir Walter Scott. It is the largest monument to a writer in the world. It stands in Princes Street Gardens in Edinburgh, opposite the Jenners department store on Princes Street and near to Edinburgh Waverley Railway Station, which is named after Scott's Waverley novels.
The house of wealthy merchant and landlord Thomas Gledstanes showcases high-rise living, 17th-century style, at the beating heart of Edinburgh's historic Royal Mile. In six rooms split across two levels, the authentically restored tenement shows how people from a variety of backgrounds went about their lives at a time when the cramped Lawnmarket was very much a living, breathing, working part of one of the world's fastest-growing and influential cities. Inside these walls you'll discover the indignities of living in cramped conditions, the embarrassing consequences of sitting too close to the fire and the gruesome punishment for cheating your customers. The Gledstanes name relates to the gilded bird of prey hanging outside the house. 'Gled' is an old Scottish word for red-tailed kite, which are often found nesting among 'stanes' or stones.
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Gladstone's Land
477B Lawnmarket
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The house of wealthy merchant and landlord Thomas Gledstanes showcases high-rise living, 17th-century style, at the beating heart of Edinburgh's historic Royal Mile. In six rooms split across two levels, the authentically restored tenement shows how people from a variety of backgrounds went about their lives at a time when the cramped Lawnmarket was very much a living, breathing, working part of one of the world's fastest-growing and influential cities. Inside these walls you'll discover the indignities of living in cramped conditions, the embarrassing consequences of sitting too close to the fire and the gruesome punishment for cheating your customers. The Gledstanes name relates to the gilded bird of prey hanging outside the house. 'Gled' is an old Scottish word for red-tailed kite, which are often found nesting among 'stanes' or stones.
The Palace of Holyroodhouse, commonly referred to as Holyrood Palace, is the official residence of the British monarch in Scotland. Located at the bottom of the Royal Mile in Edinburgh, at the opposite end to Edinburgh Castle, Holyrood Palace has served as the principal residence of the Kings and Queens of Scots since the 16th century, and is a setting for state occasions and official entertaining. Queen Elizabeth spends one week in residence at Holyrood Palace at the beginning of each summer, where she carries out a range of official engagements and ceremonies. The 16th century Historic Apartments of Mary, Queen of Scots and the State Apartments, used for official and state entertaining, are open to the public throughout the year, except when members of the Royal Family are in residence.
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Palace of Holyroodhouse
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The Palace of Holyroodhouse, commonly referred to as Holyrood Palace, is the official residence of the British monarch in Scotland. Located at the bottom of the Royal Mile in Edinburgh, at the opposite end to Edinburgh Castle, Holyrood Palace has served as the principal residence of the Kings and Queens of Scots since the 16th century, and is a setting for state occasions and official entertaining. Queen Elizabeth spends one week in residence at Holyrood Palace at the beginning of each summer, where she carries out a range of official engagements and ceremonies. The 16th century Historic Apartments of Mary, Queen of Scots and the State Apartments, used for official and state entertaining, are open to the public throughout the year, except when members of the Royal Family are in residence.
Edinburgh's Grassmarket and Victoria Street is the perfect place to spend the day discovering independent shops and from designer to vintage fashion. A buzzing restaurant, pub and shopping area beneath Edinburgh Castle, the area is full to brimming with Scottish designers, artisans and independents selling world crafts, vintage clothing and antiques to gourmet food in a vibrant al fresco setting. It has been said that Harry Potter author J.K Rowling has based Diagon Alley on Victoria St in Edinburgh, which is located a few blocks from the Elephant House café. Victoria St is a narrow, winding road with high shops on either side, including a book shop, clothing shop, and Aha ha ha joke shop at one end. There's a wide range of gifts and oddities in the Grassmarket. Treat yourself and go shopping for a designer hat at Fabhatrix, grab a piece of prehistory at Mr Wood's Fossils, or uncover a fab vintage find at Armstrongs. Once you're all shopped out, enjoy a quick stop at the Cat Cafe - Maison de Moggy or a sweet treat at Marys Milk Bar. - See more at: http://thisisedinburgh.com/things-to-do/activities/shopping/#sthash.1YUS4uy2.dpuf
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Victoria Street
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Edinburgh's Grassmarket and Victoria Street is the perfect place to spend the day discovering independent shops and from designer to vintage fashion. A buzzing restaurant, pub and shopping area beneath Edinburgh Castle, the area is full to brimming with Scottish designers, artisans and independents selling world crafts, vintage clothing and antiques to gourmet food in a vibrant al fresco setting. It has been said that Harry Potter author J.K Rowling has based Diagon Alley on Victoria St in Edinburgh, which is located a few blocks from the Elephant House café. Victoria St is a narrow, winding road with high shops on either side, including a book shop, clothing shop, and Aha ha ha joke shop at one end. There's a wide range of gifts and oddities in the Grassmarket. Treat yourself and go shopping for a designer hat at Fabhatrix, grab a piece of prehistory at Mr Wood's Fossils, or uncover a fab vintage find at Armstrongs. Once you're all shopped out, enjoy a quick stop at the Cat Cafe - Maison de Moggy or a sweet treat at Marys Milk Bar. - See more at: http://thisisedinburgh.com/things-to-do/activities/shopping/#sthash.1YUS4uy2.dpuf
Getting Around
Main train station
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Edinburgh Waverley
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Main train station
Parks & Nature
Arthur's Seat is the main peak of the group of hills in Edinburgh, which form most of Holyrood Park, described by Robert Louis Stevenson as "a hill for magnitude, a mountain in virtue of its bold design". It is situated in the centre of the city of Edinburgh, about 1 mile (1.6 km) to the east of Edinburgh Castle. The hill rises above the city to a height of 250.5 m (822 ft), provides excellent panoramic views of the city, is relatively easy to climb, and is popular for hillwalking. Though it can be climbed from almost any direction, the easiest and simplest ascent is from the east, where a grassy slope rises above Dunsapie Loch.
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Артурс Сит
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Arthur's Seat is the main peak of the group of hills in Edinburgh, which form most of Holyrood Park, described by Robert Louis Stevenson as "a hill for magnitude, a mountain in virtue of its bold design". It is situated in the centre of the city of Edinburgh, about 1 mile (1.6 km) to the east of Edinburgh Castle. The hill rises above the city to a height of 250.5 m (822 ft), provides excellent panoramic views of the city, is relatively easy to climb, and is popular for hillwalking. Though it can be climbed from almost any direction, the easiest and simplest ascent is from the east, where a grassy slope rises above Dunsapie Loch.
The Meadows is a large public park in of the south of the town centre. It consists largely of open grassland crossed by tree-lined paths, but also has a children's playground, a croquet club, tennis courts and recreational sport pitches. It is a nice park where you can chill out. There are also nice coffee shops close by.
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Медоус
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The Meadows is a large public park in of the south of the town centre. It consists largely of open grassland crossed by tree-lined paths, but also has a children's playground, a croquet club, tennis courts and recreational sport pitches. It is a nice park where you can chill out. There are also nice coffee shops close by.
Calton Hill is a hill in central Edinburgh, Scotland, situated beyond the east end of Princes Street and included in the city's UNESCO World Heritage Site. Views of, and from, the hill are often used in photographs and paintings of the city. It is the reason why Edinburgh is called the Athens of North. No one knows how this extinct volcano in Holyrood Park got its name, but die-hard romantics think it was the location of Camelot. It's 251 metres high, but if you have enough puff and the right footwear it is a relatively easy climb. I like to start opposite the Palace of Holyroodhouse car park and follow the Radical Road path — paved in 1820 by unemployed weavers — past Salisbury Crags. Take in the ruins of St Anthony’s Chapel before the steep climb to the rocky summit with its incredible views. Follow marked routes (maps available at the Holyrood Park Information Centre in Horsewynd) and pay attention to signs telling you where not to walk — it might be crowded with walkers of every description, but can still be dangerous.
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Calton Hill
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Calton Hill is a hill in central Edinburgh, Scotland, situated beyond the east end of Princes Street and included in the city's UNESCO World Heritage Site. Views of, and from, the hill are often used in photographs and paintings of the city. It is the reason why Edinburgh is called the Athens of North. No one knows how this extinct volcano in Holyrood Park got its name, but die-hard romantics think it was the location of Camelot. It's 251 metres high, but if you have enough puff and the right footwear it is a relatively easy climb. I like to start opposite the Palace of Holyroodhouse car park and follow the Radical Road path — paved in 1820 by unemployed weavers — past Salisbury Crags. Take in the ruins of St Anthony’s Chapel before the steep climb to the rocky summit with its incredible views. Follow marked routes (maps available at the Holyrood Park Information Centre in Horsewynd) and pay attention to signs telling you where not to walk — it might be crowded with walkers of every description, but can still be dangerous.
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Принсес стрит Гарденс
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It is easy to miss the entrance to this drowsily peaceful hidden garden, a few steps off The Royal Mile just past Canongate Kirk. Created by the visionary Sir Patrick Geddes as one of a network of Old Town gardens, it was immaculately restored in the late 1970s. A beautifully kept recreation of a 17th-century garden, it is a series of small, delightfully private rooms. If it’s fine, grab a picnic from Mimi’s Picnic Parlour (mimisbakehouse.com) on your way down the Canongate to eat sitting on one of the tiny lawns at the very end of the garden.
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Dunbars Close
137 Canongate
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It is easy to miss the entrance to this drowsily peaceful hidden garden, a few steps off The Royal Mile just past Canongate Kirk. Created by the visionary Sir Patrick Geddes as one of a network of Old Town gardens, it was immaculately restored in the late 1970s. A beautifully kept recreation of a 17th-century garden, it is a series of small, delightfully private rooms. If it’s fine, grab a picnic from Mimi’s Picnic Parlour (mimisbakehouse.com) on your way down the Canongate to eat sitting on one of the tiny lawns at the very end of the garden.
At the first sign of a sunny day it feels as if all Edinburgh heads to this deliriously tranquil space, only 15 minutes’ walk from the city centre, but somehow never crowded. With 70 acres of trees, shrubs, rare plants and specialist gardens, it’s easy to happily lose yourself. If it rains, shelter in the gloriously steamy Victorian Palm House (the tallest in Britain), although I like to hide in the seashell and pinecone decorated stone pavilion in the Queen Mother’s Memorial Garden. There are guided garden walks from the John Hope Gateway and exhibitions in 18th-century Inverleith House. The Gatehouse Restaurant serves breakfast, lunch and tea, eat outdoors at the self-service Terrace Cafe or grab a snack at the East Gate Coffee Bar.
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Ройал Ботаник Гарден Эдинбург
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At the first sign of a sunny day it feels as if all Edinburgh heads to this deliriously tranquil space, only 15 minutes’ walk from the city centre, but somehow never crowded. With 70 acres of trees, shrubs, rare plants and specialist gardens, it’s easy to happily lose yourself. If it rains, shelter in the gloriously steamy Victorian Palm House (the tallest in Britain), although I like to hide in the seashell and pinecone decorated stone pavilion in the Queen Mother’s Memorial Garden. There are guided garden walks from the John Hope Gateway and exhibitions in 18th-century Inverleith House. The Gatehouse Restaurant serves breakfast, lunch and tea, eat outdoors at the self-service Terrace Cafe or grab a snack at the East Gate Coffee Bar.
The Water of Leith is a designated urban wildlife site running through the city, with woods and wildflowers, herons, kingfishers and even roe deer. Recently, a pair of otters were spotted onthis hidden 12-mile walkway from Balerno to Leith docks. There are plenty of access points, but the section I walk most often starts at the Water of Leith Visitor Centre in Slateford. From there, head towards Leith, passing through charming Dean Village with its converted mills and a dramatic Thomas Telford bridge, then past elegant St Bernard’s Well to Stockbridge or Canonmills where you can catch buses back to Princes Street. You can buy useful downloadable maps and a new audio trail on the Water of Leith Conservation Trust website.
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Water of Leith Walkway
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The Water of Leith is a designated urban wildlife site running through the city, with woods and wildflowers, herons, kingfishers and even roe deer. Recently, a pair of otters were spotted onthis hidden 12-mile walkway from Balerno to Leith docks. There are plenty of access points, but the section I walk most often starts at the Water of Leith Visitor Centre in Slateford. From there, head towards Leith, passing through charming Dean Village with its converted mills and a dramatic Thomas Telford bridge, then past elegant St Bernard’s Well to Stockbridge or Canonmills where you can catch buses back to Princes Street. You can buy useful downloadable maps and a new audio trail on the Water of Leith Conservation Trust website.
The Water of Leith is a designated urban wildlife site running through the city, with woods and wildflowers, herons, kingfishers and even roe deer. Recently, a pair of otters were spotted onthis hidden 12-mile walkway from Balerno to Leith docks. There are plenty of access points, but the section I walk most often starts at the Water of Leith Visitor Centre in Slateford. From there, head towards Leith, passing through charming Dean Village with its converted mills and a dramatic Thomas Telford bridge, then past elegant St Bernard’s Well to Stockbridge or Canonmills where you can catch buses back to Princes Street. You can buy useful downloadable maps and a new audio trail on the Water of Leith Conservation Trust website.
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Уотер оф Лейт
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The Water of Leith is a designated urban wildlife site running through the city, with woods and wildflowers, herons, kingfishers and even roe deer. Recently, a pair of otters were spotted onthis hidden 12-mile walkway from Balerno to Leith docks. There are plenty of access points, but the section I walk most often starts at the Water of Leith Visitor Centre in Slateford. From there, head towards Leith, passing through charming Dean Village with its converted mills and a dramatic Thomas Telford bridge, then past elegant St Bernard’s Well to Stockbridge or Canonmills where you can catch buses back to Princes Street. You can buy useful downloadable maps and a new audio trail on the Water of Leith Conservation Trust website.
This pretty village on the far side of Holyrood Park dates from the 12th century, with the Sheep Heid Inn claiming to be Scotland’s oldest pub. The inn takes its name from a ram’s head apparently given to the pub’s landlord by King James VI (sadly, history does not relate why…). East of the pub is Prince Charlie’s Cottage, where a council of war was held the night before the battle of Prestonpans, and Duddingston Kirk with its louping-on-stane – a raised platform that allowed farmer’s wives to mount the horse behind their husbands without exposing more than the hem of their petticoats. Between the kirk and Duddingston Loch is the enchanting labour of love that is Dr Neil’s Garden (open all year round; drneilsgarden.co.uk). Look out for Thomson’s Tower, designed by architect Willam Henry Playfair in 1825 for the Duddingston Curling Society. Duddingston is a particularly good destination for a winter’s walk – if you are lucky you might see the loch (which is also a bird sanctuary) frozen over, just as in Sir Henry Raeburn’s famous portrait of The Skating Minister (which can be seen at the Scottish National Gallery on the Mound). Warm up in front of the fire with a dram at the inn (say ‘the sheep’s heid’ in your best Scottish accent) before getting a number 42 bus back to the city centre.
Duddingston Park
This pretty village on the far side of Holyrood Park dates from the 12th century, with the Sheep Heid Inn claiming to be Scotland’s oldest pub. The inn takes its name from a ram’s head apparently given to the pub’s landlord by King James VI (sadly, history does not relate why…). East of the pub is Prince Charlie’s Cottage, where a council of war was held the night before the battle of Prestonpans, and Duddingston Kirk with its louping-on-stane – a raised platform that allowed farmer’s wives to mount the horse behind their husbands without exposing more than the hem of their petticoats. Between the kirk and Duddingston Loch is the enchanting labour of love that is Dr Neil’s Garden (open all year round; drneilsgarden.co.uk). Look out for Thomson’s Tower, designed by architect Willam Henry Playfair in 1825 for the Duddingston Curling Society. Duddingston is a particularly good destination for a winter’s walk – if you are lucky you might see the loch (which is also a bird sanctuary) frozen over, just as in Sir Henry Raeburn’s famous portrait of The Skating Minister (which can be seen at the Scottish National Gallery on the Mound). Warm up in front of the fire with a dram at the inn (say ‘the sheep’s heid’ in your best Scottish accent) before getting a number 42 bus back to the city centre.
City crowds getting a bit much? Be like generations of Edinburgh day-trippers: jump on the bus and head for Portobello Beach. There might not be donkey rides any more, but ’Porty’ still retains considerable old-fashioned seaside charms. It has a mile of sand, a promenade, sailing club, kite flying, blokarting (sand yachting), kite-surfing and clean water for paddling and safe swimming (no lifeguards). Bored with the beach? Close by you will find ice-cream parlours, sweetie shops, amusement arcades, family-friendly cafés and pubs. Try the Beach House Café, right on the promenade, before indulging in a Turkish Bath (£7.20) at the Portobello Swim Centre further down the beach.
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Portobello Beach
1 Promenade
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City crowds getting a bit much? Be like generations of Edinburgh day-trippers: jump on the bus and head for Portobello Beach. There might not be donkey rides any more, but ’Porty’ still retains considerable old-fashioned seaside charms. It has a mile of sand, a promenade, sailing club, kite flying, blokarting (sand yachting), kite-surfing and clean water for paddling and safe swimming (no lifeguards). Bored with the beach? Close by you will find ice-cream parlours, sweetie shops, amusement arcades, family-friendly cafés and pubs. Try the Beach House Café, right on the promenade, before indulging in a Turkish Bath (£7.20) at the Portobello Swim Centre further down the beach.
The Edinburgh and Dalkeith Railway nicknamed “The Innocent Railway” opened in 1831 and it was initially horse-drawn as steam engines were considered dangerous! The railway closed in 1968 but re-opened as a path for walkers and cyclists in 1981. The Innocent Railway Tunnel was the first railway tunnel in Britain and it is 517 metres (566 yards) long. The Innocent Railway path begins with the cool and damp tunnel near St Leonard’s, but once through the tunnel you enter a pleasant green corridor that continues towards Duddingston. The Innocent Railway path runs from the Newington/St Leonard's area under Holyrood Park via Duddingston and Craigmillar to Brunstane in the East of the city. It is one of Edinburgh's extensive off-road pedestrian cycleways and part of the UK-wide, National Cycle Network's Route 1 (NCN1).
Innocent Railway
The Edinburgh and Dalkeith Railway nicknamed “The Innocent Railway” opened in 1831 and it was initially horse-drawn as steam engines were considered dangerous! The railway closed in 1968 but re-opened as a path for walkers and cyclists in 1981. The Innocent Railway Tunnel was the first railway tunnel in Britain and it is 517 metres (566 yards) long. The Innocent Railway path begins with the cool and damp tunnel near St Leonard’s, but once through the tunnel you enter a pleasant green corridor that continues towards Duddingston. The Innocent Railway path runs from the Newington/St Leonard's area under Holyrood Park via Duddingston and Craigmillar to Brunstane in the East of the city. It is one of Edinburgh's extensive off-road pedestrian cycleways and part of the UK-wide, National Cycle Network's Route 1 (NCN1).