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Guidebook for Edinburgh

Rafael

Guidebook for Edinburgh

Food Scene
Tesco Express
74 Stenhouse Pl E
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Sainsbury's
39 Westfield Rd
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The Stenhouse Takeaway
12 Stenhouse Cross
SWS Chinese
8 Stenhouse Cross
We serve over 150 dishes at our restaurants. We carefully prepare each of these in small batches to ensure they are always fresh. We also take an enormous amount of pride in the presentation, our dishes are a feast for the eyes not just the taste buds. We invite you to take a gastronomic journey through different countries and cultures, so you can discover the most authentic flavours of the world.
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COSMO
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We serve over 150 dishes at our restaurants. We carefully prepare each of these in small batches to ensure they are always fresh. We also take an enormous amount of pride in the presentation, our dishes are a feast for the eyes not just the taste buds. We invite you to take a gastronomic journey through different countries and cultures, so you can discover the most authentic flavours of the world.
The Radford family are creative, experienced restauranteurs and it shows in their clever conversion of a former warehouse into this surprisingly intimate space, with a wood-burning stove and rugs for the winter and a sheltered, sunny courtyard for summer. Committed to quality and provenance, they grow herbs, cure and smoke meat and fish and make their own bar cordials and shrubs on site, using unusual ingredients to great imaginative effect without ever lapsing into preciousness. The menu is helpfully divided into ‘bite’, ‘small’ and ‘large’ dishes, all cooked with careful consideration. Lunch or dinner around £25-£40; reservations recommended (0131 221 1222; timberyard.co)
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TIMBERYARD
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The Radford family are creative, experienced restauranteurs and it shows in their clever conversion of a former warehouse into this surprisingly intimate space, with a wood-burning stove and rugs for the winter and a sheltered, sunny courtyard for summer. Committed to quality and provenance, they grow herbs, cure and smoke meat and fish and make their own bar cordials and shrubs on site, using unusual ingredients to great imaginative effect without ever lapsing into preciousness. The menu is helpfully divided into ‘bite’, ‘small’ and ‘large’ dishes, all cooked with careful consideration. Lunch or dinner around £25-£40; reservations recommended (0131 221 1222; timberyard.co)
Michelin-starred Paul Kitching (not to be confused with Tom Kitchin) works his endlessly inventive magic in a classic Georgian townhouse, its décor an immaculate lesson in soothing modern elegance. With never more than three courses and a new menu each week, he achieves a delightfully light-hearted feel for such serious cooking. Do not come here if you like your food simple: with a reputation for completely unique if startling flavour combinations that always work, this is a chef at his most playfully confident. Three-course lunch menu from £32; set-price five-course dinner £69; reservations recommended (0131 523 1030; 21212restaurant.co.uk)
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21212
3 Royal Terrace
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Michelin-starred Paul Kitching (not to be confused with Tom Kitchin) works his endlessly inventive magic in a classic Georgian townhouse, its décor an immaculate lesson in soothing modern elegance. With never more than three courses and a new menu each week, he achieves a delightfully light-hearted feel for such serious cooking. Do not come here if you like your food simple: with a reputation for completely unique if startling flavour combinations that always work, this is a chef at his most playfully confident. Three-course lunch menu from £32; set-price five-course dinner £69; reservations recommended (0131 523 1030; 21212restaurant.co.uk)
Awarded the first Michelin star in Edinburgh in 2001, Martin Wishart was a fine-dining pioneer in Leith. The restaurant serves what I can only describe as tweezer food with attitude: painstakingly composed to create the prettiest plates imaginable, but full of intense and sometimes surprising flavours. The piped music is puzzlingly intrusive for such an elegant, restrained setting, but it is the only off-note in a more often than not pitch-perfect composition. The six-course tasting menu, including the signature ceviche of Gigha halibut with mango and passion fruit, costs £75; there is a fish and shellfish version for the same price or, more unusually, a £70 vegetarian tasting menu as well. If fiscal responsibility intrudes, try the terrific Tuesday to Friday lunch menu for £28.50, or head to Wishart’s popular brasserie, The Honours, on Castle Street just down the hill from Princes Street. Reservations recommended (0131 553 3557; restaurantmartinwishart.co.uk)
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Restaurant Martin Wishart
54 Shore
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Awarded the first Michelin star in Edinburgh in 2001, Martin Wishart was a fine-dining pioneer in Leith. The restaurant serves what I can only describe as tweezer food with attitude: painstakingly composed to create the prettiest plates imaginable, but full of intense and sometimes surprising flavours. The piped music is puzzlingly intrusive for such an elegant, restrained setting, but it is the only off-note in a more often than not pitch-perfect composition. The six-course tasting menu, including the signature ceviche of Gigha halibut with mango and passion fruit, costs £75; there is a fish and shellfish version for the same price or, more unusually, a £70 vegetarian tasting menu as well. If fiscal responsibility intrudes, try the terrific Tuesday to Friday lunch menu for £28.50, or head to Wishart’s popular brasserie, The Honours, on Castle Street just down the hill from Princes Street. Reservations recommended (0131 553 3557; restaurantmartinwishart.co.uk)
Cherubic-looking Tom Kitchin took only six months to earn his first Michelin star at this restaurant in a converted warehouse on a previously uninspiring street in Leith. Applying classical French technique and exactitude to predominantly Scottish ingredients, he doesn’t just talk the talk about his ‘nature to plate’ philosophy. With a new facelift and expanded premises it should be a little easier to get a table at the weekend or during the summer, but it is still safest to book well in advance – although it is always worth checking for last-minute cancellations. Set-price lunch £28.50; otherwise lunch or dinner around £65 (0131 555 1755; thekitchin.com)
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The Kitchin
78 Commercial St
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Cherubic-looking Tom Kitchin took only six months to earn his first Michelin star at this restaurant in a converted warehouse on a previously uninspiring street in Leith. Applying classical French technique and exactitude to predominantly Scottish ingredients, he doesn’t just talk the talk about his ‘nature to plate’ philosophy. With a new facelift and expanded premises it should be a little easier to get a table at the weekend or during the summer, but it is still safest to book well in advance – although it is always worth checking for last-minute cancellations. Set-price lunch £28.50; otherwise lunch or dinner around £65 (0131 555 1755; thekitchin.com)
With Jeff Bland, the executive chef who's held a Michelin star for 13 years, and his talented head chef Brian Grigor, the newly refurbished Number One at the Balmoral Hotel continues the tradition of serving some of Edinburgh's best food. The deep red lacquered walls, covered in an intriguing selection of modern art, warm oak floors, deep banquettes, and generous space between tables give a feeling of old-school glamour and ease. There's nothing old school about the cooking, though, with dishes to make you sigh with quiet pleasure - the signature Balvenie smoked salmon is a silken, citrusy delight. Three-course a la carte menu £70; reservations recommended (0131 557 6727;
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The Balmoral
1 Princes St
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With Jeff Bland, the executive chef who's held a Michelin star for 13 years, and his talented head chef Brian Grigor, the newly refurbished Number One at the Balmoral Hotel continues the tradition of serving some of Edinburgh's best food. The deep red lacquered walls, covered in an intriguing selection of modern art, warm oak floors, deep banquettes, and generous space between tables give a feeling of old-school glamour and ease. There's nothing old school about the cooking, though, with dishes to make you sigh with quiet pleasure - the signature Balvenie smoked salmon is a silken, citrusy delight. Three-course a la carte menu £70; reservations recommended (0131 557 6727;
With communal seating at two tables in one room and one table in the other, this little restaurant is no place for misanthropes. It really was a gardener’s cottage although it sits rather incongruously just off the busy London Road. They grow vegetables out front to prove their credentials and the look is sympathetically simple, although I would describe the cooking as sophisticated-rustic. If you are a vegetarian or have allergies, request a copy of the set menu in advance so they can accommodate your needs. For those who just have to have a choice, lunch is served à la carte and there is brunch at weekends. Lunch around £25-£30; set-price dinner £35; reservations recommended (0131 558 1221; thegardenerscottage.co)
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The Gardener's Cottage
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With communal seating at two tables in one room and one table in the other, this little restaurant is no place for misanthropes. It really was a gardener’s cottage although it sits rather incongruously just off the busy London Road. They grow vegetables out front to prove their credentials and the look is sympathetically simple, although I would describe the cooking as sophisticated-rustic. If you are a vegetarian or have allergies, request a copy of the set menu in advance so they can accommodate your needs. For those who just have to have a choice, lunch is served à la carte and there is brunch at weekends. Lunch around £25-£30; set-price dinner £35; reservations recommended (0131 558 1221; thegardenerscottage.co)
You have to love a man who is all about puddings, which means I have the biggest crush in the world on Mark Greenaway. Peanut caramel cheesecake has my name written all over it, although 11-hour slow-roasted belly pork makes me go weak at the knees as well. Since his appearance on the TV show The Great British Menu, tables at the restaurant have been more in demand than ever, but the £22 pre-theatre Market Menu is worth eating early for. Lunch or dinner around £35; also £22 pre-theatre menu; reservations recommended (0131 226 1155; markgreenaway.com)
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Restaurant Mark Greenaway
69 North Castle Street
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You have to love a man who is all about puddings, which means I have the biggest crush in the world on Mark Greenaway. Peanut caramel cheesecake has my name written all over it, although 11-hour slow-roasted belly pork makes me go weak at the knees as well. Since his appearance on the TV show The Great British Menu, tables at the restaurant have been more in demand than ever, but the £22 pre-theatre Market Menu is worth eating early for. Lunch or dinner around £35; also £22 pre-theatre menu; reservations recommended (0131 226 1155; markgreenaway.com)
‘Scran' is a Scottish word for food, while ‘scallie’ appears to mean squint-eyed — which must refer to people having trouble with the menu, which is littered with phrases like: ‘sit ye down yer welcome’ and ‘nae meat, nae fish’. Don’t let these regrettable lapses into tweeness send you running for the door, because the food at Tom and Michaela Kitchin’s new venture is as good as you would expect from a man with two Michelin-starred restaurants on his CV. The sheep’s heid broth is a great deal better than it might sound and main course portions of fish pie and meltingly delicious braised hogget are enormous. If you want to be sure of a table make a reservation, but they do hold a few tables back every service for walk-ins. Children allowed until 10pm. Lunch or dinner around £18-£30 (0131 332 6281; scranandscallie.com)
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The Scran and Scallie
1 Comely Bank Rd
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‘Scran' is a Scottish word for food, while ‘scallie’ appears to mean squint-eyed — which must refer to people having trouble with the menu, which is littered with phrases like: ‘sit ye down yer welcome’ and ‘nae meat, nae fish’. Don’t let these regrettable lapses into tweeness send you running for the door, because the food at Tom and Michaela Kitchin’s new venture is as good as you would expect from a man with two Michelin-starred restaurants on his CV. The sheep’s heid broth is a great deal better than it might sound and main course portions of fish pie and meltingly delicious braised hogget are enormous. If you want to be sure of a table make a reservation, but they do hold a few tables back every service for walk-ins. Children allowed until 10pm. Lunch or dinner around £18-£30 (0131 332 6281; scranandscallie.com)
David Ramsden, owner of The Dogs, is an Edinburgh restaurant stalwart (and well-known curmudgeon), and this consistently good, mid-priced place to eat is his response to the ubiquitous gastropub. It serves what can only be described as good, honest cooking in an appealingly rambling, just the right side of scruffy setting. The menu is heavy on recession-busting offal and cheaper cuts of meat, like liver, oxtail, venison and rabbit. The wine list is as straightforward as the food, with many bottles under £20. It is usefully located on Hanover Street between Princes Street and George Street. Lunch around £15; dinner around £20-£30; reservations recommended (0131 220 1208; thedogsonline.co.uk)
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the dogs
110 Hanover St
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David Ramsden, owner of The Dogs, is an Edinburgh restaurant stalwart (and well-known curmudgeon), and this consistently good, mid-priced place to eat is his response to the ubiquitous gastropub. It serves what can only be described as good, honest cooking in an appealingly rambling, just the right side of scruffy setting. The menu is heavy on recession-busting offal and cheaper cuts of meat, like liver, oxtail, venison and rabbit. The wine list is as straightforward as the food, with many bottles under £20. It is usefully located on Hanover Street between Princes Street and George Street. Lunch around £15; dinner around £20-£30; reservations recommended (0131 220 1208; thedogsonline.co.uk)
Chef Ting’s restaurant started life as an itinerant pop-up across several Festival seasons before disappearing again like a swallow with a poor sense of direction. However, it has now settled into an Old Town nest and shows no sign of flying off anytime soon. This is as close as Edinburgh gets to real Thai street food: hot, sour, sweet, slippery, crispy, comforting and utterly addictive. It is food for sharing… and fighting over. The food comes in cardboard boxes, they don’t take credit or debit cards, you can’t book, service is stripped back and so is the décor, but who cares when it all tastes so good? If you don’t like perching on high stools at communal tables you can order take-away, but either way be prepared to wait – everyone wants a taste of the Thai life. Panang Nua, £8.60 (00 44 131 225 9801).
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Ting Thai Caravan
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Chef Ting’s restaurant started life as an itinerant pop-up across several Festival seasons before disappearing again like a swallow with a poor sense of direction. However, it has now settled into an Old Town nest and shows no sign of flying off anytime soon. This is as close as Edinburgh gets to real Thai street food: hot, sour, sweet, slippery, crispy, comforting and utterly addictive. It is food for sharing… and fighting over. The food comes in cardboard boxes, they don’t take credit or debit cards, you can’t book, service is stripped back and so is the décor, but who cares when it all tastes so good? If you don’t like perching on high stools at communal tables you can order take-away, but either way be prepared to wait – everyone wants a taste of the Thai life. Panang Nua, £8.60 (00 44 131 225 9801).
Drinks & Nightlife
Hidden down a narrow, medieval close opposite St Giles' Cathedral, this new bar and kitchen has sent the town’s bloggers and twitter mavens into paroxysms of joy. Outside there is an enormous terrace and deck, while the ruined walls next door shelter an allotment garden that will provide fresh produce for the kitchen. With an ever-expanding choice of whiskies, a cleverly constructed wine list (most available by half-bottle and glass) and arguably the most interesting cocktails in Edinburgh, it is already deservedly popular. Order a ‘Howitzer' cocktail: whisky, citric acid, ginger syrup, house blended tea and soda, then have dinner (be sure and reserve a table). You know the food will be good when you see the chef strolling in with a bundle of dirty rhubarb tucked under his arm (0131 225 4465; devilsadvocateedinburgh.co.uk)
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The Devil's Advocate
9 Advocate's Cl
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Hidden down a narrow, medieval close opposite St Giles' Cathedral, this new bar and kitchen has sent the town’s bloggers and twitter mavens into paroxysms of joy. Outside there is an enormous terrace and deck, while the ruined walls next door shelter an allotment garden that will provide fresh produce for the kitchen. With an ever-expanding choice of whiskies, a cleverly constructed wine list (most available by half-bottle and glass) and arguably the most interesting cocktails in Edinburgh, it is already deservedly popular. Order a ‘Howitzer' cocktail: whisky, citric acid, ginger syrup, house blended tea and soda, then have dinner (be sure and reserve a table). You know the food will be good when you see the chef strolling in with a bundle of dirty rhubarb tucked under his arm (0131 225 4465; devilsadvocateedinburgh.co.uk)
An entirely bling-free zone, The Last Word Saloon is warm and dark and discreet — the sort of place you can imagine Bogart and Bacall meeting for a drink. My favourite tipple is a ‘Who Dares Wins’: gin, lemon juice, homemade almond syrup and kummel. There is a punch of the day and a takeaway cocktail; even the house pours are interesting. The staff are friendly and obliging and it has a great neighbourhood feel. Often someone is sitting by one of the two fires struggling to read — bring a torch if you are of a certain age or you might have trouble deciphering the drinks menu (0131 225 9009; lastwordsaloon.com)
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The Last Word Saloon
44 St Stephen St
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An entirely bling-free zone, The Last Word Saloon is warm and dark and discreet — the sort of place you can imagine Bogart and Bacall meeting for a drink. My favourite tipple is a ‘Who Dares Wins’: gin, lemon juice, homemade almond syrup and kummel. There is a punch of the day and a takeaway cocktail; even the house pours are interesting. The staff are friendly and obliging and it has a great neighbourhood feel. Often someone is sitting by one of the two fires struggling to read — bring a torch if you are of a certain age or you might have trouble deciphering the drinks menu (0131 225 9009; lastwordsaloon.com)
Formerly the grandest bank branch you ever saw, The Dome is still a place where you deposit your money...but now it’s a lot more fun. The truly jaw-dropping setting means it always feels like an occasion, whether just for a coffee, afternoon tea, a drink, a light lunch or something a little more substantial. With its usefully central location it is a favourite meeting place for Edinburghers of every ilk — and so busy they do not take table reservations on Saturdays (0131 624 8624; thedomeedinburgh.com/introduction)
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The Dome
14 George St
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Formerly the grandest bank branch you ever saw, The Dome is still a place where you deposit your money...but now it’s a lot more fun. The truly jaw-dropping setting means it always feels like an occasion, whether just for a coffee, afternoon tea, a drink, a light lunch or something a little more substantial. With its usefully central location it is a favourite meeting place for Edinburghers of every ilk — and so busy they do not take table reservations on Saturdays (0131 624 8624; thedomeedinburgh.com/introduction)
If this bar were a woman it would be a belle époque courtesan: stylish, ornate and just the tiniest bit overblown. With its Royal Doulton ceramic mural of great inventors, stained glass and gilded plasterwork, the Victorian bar is enduringly popular. Settle into the spacious leather booths, have a dozen oysters and a glass or two of white wine and enjoy the sight of people thoroughly enjoying themselves, the same way they have since 1863 — only the fashions have changed (0131 5561884; caferoyaledinburgh.co.uk)
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Cafe Royal
19 W Register St
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If this bar were a woman it would be a belle époque courtesan: stylish, ornate and just the tiniest bit overblown. With its Royal Doulton ceramic mural of great inventors, stained glass and gilded plasterwork, the Victorian bar is enduringly popular. Settle into the spacious leather booths, have a dozen oysters and a glass or two of white wine and enjoy the sight of people thoroughly enjoying themselves, the same way they have since 1863 — only the fashions have changed (0131 5561884; caferoyaledinburgh.co.uk)
You might need a trail of breadcrumbs to find this cocktail bar, hidden in a Queen Street cellar. Its cocktails include retro classics as well as fabulous new inventions: try a Campbeltown (single malt whisky, Cherry Heering and green chartreuse) or a Mint Choc Flip. Or get one of the barmen, who are all understudies for the role of Prince Charming, to create a cocktail especially for you. There are DJs every Friday and Saturday night — Nasty P and Scottie Boy are regulars (0131 226 6343; bramblebar.co.uk)
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Bramble Bar & Lounge
16A Queen St
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You might need a trail of breadcrumbs to find this cocktail bar, hidden in a Queen Street cellar. Its cocktails include retro classics as well as fabulous new inventions: try a Campbeltown (single malt whisky, Cherry Heering and green chartreuse) or a Mint Choc Flip. Or get one of the barmen, who are all understudies for the role of Prince Charming, to create a cocktail especially for you. There are DJs every Friday and Saturday night — Nasty P and Scottie Boy are regulars (0131 226 6343; bramblebar.co.uk)
A properly local pub and probably the last sailor’s bar in Leith, if the life jackets, buoys and ships’ flags hanging from the ceiling are anything to go by. It might be sleepy on weekday afternoons, but on Saturday night it’s a party pub and can get rowdy. A recent lost property clear-out produced a bra, a pair of big pants and an inflatable dinghy. The beer’s cheap, the welcome is warm and you are more or less guaranteed to have a great time — just don’t say you’re in Edinburgh (0131 554 3568)
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Port O' Leith
58 Constitution St
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A properly local pub and probably the last sailor’s bar in Leith, if the life jackets, buoys and ships’ flags hanging from the ceiling are anything to go by. It might be sleepy on weekday afternoons, but on Saturday night it’s a party pub and can get rowdy. A recent lost property clear-out produced a bra, a pair of big pants and an inflatable dinghy. The beer’s cheap, the welcome is warm and you are more or less guaranteed to have a great time — just don’t say you’re in Edinburgh (0131 554 3568)
If you ever need to find an off-duty lawyer in Edinburgh, The Bow Bar is the place to look. There are over 230 malt whiskies, eight cask ales and an impressive selection of bottled beers, like the intriguingly named Maui Brewing Coconut Porter — even people who think they do not drink beer will find something they like. Like all the best bars it gets busy, with standing room only after work when the briefs form circles round their cases. It’s a great place for a quiet Saturday morning; grab a pint and a Findlay’s of Portobello pie or soup from The Grain Store restaurant on the other side of the Bow and settle in (0131 226 7667)
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The Bow Bar
80 W Bow
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If you ever need to find an off-duty lawyer in Edinburgh, The Bow Bar is the place to look. There are over 230 malt whiskies, eight cask ales and an impressive selection of bottled beers, like the intriguingly named Maui Brewing Coconut Porter — even people who think they do not drink beer will find something they like. Like all the best bars it gets busy, with standing room only after work when the briefs form circles round their cases. It’s a great place for a quiet Saturday morning; grab a pint and a Findlay’s of Portobello pie or soup from The Grain Store restaurant on the other side of the Bow and settle in (0131 226 7667)
With no shortage of gussied-up pubs on the Royal Mile, people tend to overlook this old-timer just round the corner in St Mary’s Street. This is a mistake. Behind the distinctive black-and-white exterior there is a classic, cluttered, cosy pub where pint glasses still have handles, Billie Holiday sings the blues and the Guid Crack Club meets the last Friday of every month to swap stories. Only three beers are on tap and the selection of spirits is reassuringly old-fashioned, so do not even think of asking for a cocktail — although you could probably get a Babycham. Despite the advertised evening opening times, they pretty well keep to whatever hours suit them. This is a great and truly original pub. Never mind the cobwebs, feel the character (0131 556 8855).
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The Waverley Bar
3-5 St Mary's St
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With no shortage of gussied-up pubs on the Royal Mile, people tend to overlook this old-timer just round the corner in St Mary’s Street. This is a mistake. Behind the distinctive black-and-white exterior there is a classic, cluttered, cosy pub where pint glasses still have handles, Billie Holiday sings the blues and the Guid Crack Club meets the last Friday of every month to swap stories. Only three beers are on tap and the selection of spirits is reassuringly old-fashioned, so do not even think of asking for a cocktail — although you could probably get a Babycham. Despite the advertised evening opening times, they pretty well keep to whatever hours suit them. This is a great and truly original pub. Never mind the cobwebs, feel the character (0131 556 8855).
This little pub on Infirmary Street, opposite Blackwell’s Bookshop, is a friendly, traditional pub with neither airs, nor graces, nor pretensions to anything other than offering live folk music from local musicians every night of the week, as it has done for 35 years. The haunted cellars are said to have been used by murdering bodysnatchers Burke and Hare and are probably the only cellars in the Old Town not regularly invaded by ghost tours. The wines here might haunt you as well; better to stick to real spirits or beer (0131 557 2976; royal-oak-folk.com)
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The Royal Oak
1 Infirmary St
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This little pub on Infirmary Street, opposite Blackwell’s Bookshop, is a friendly, traditional pub with neither airs, nor graces, nor pretensions to anything other than offering live folk music from local musicians every night of the week, as it has done for 35 years. The haunted cellars are said to have been used by murdering bodysnatchers Burke and Hare and are probably the only cellars in the Old Town not regularly invaded by ghost tours. The wines here might haunt you as well; better to stick to real spirits or beer (0131 557 2976; royal-oak-folk.com)
If you have a problem with men in red corduroy trousers, this New Town local on quiet Cumberland Street is not for you. Immortalised in Alexander McCall Smith’s 44 Scotland Street, this attractive pub is deservedly popular, with Black Isle Blonde available on tap and a Sunday roast that regularly sells out (be sure and book). The real draw is the shady beer garden (heated in winter), arguably the nicest in Edinburgh (0131 558 3134;cumberlandbar.co.uk).
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The Cumberland Bar
1-3 Cumberland St
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If you have a problem with men in red corduroy trousers, this New Town local on quiet Cumberland Street is not for you. Immortalised in Alexander McCall Smith’s 44 Scotland Street, this attractive pub is deservedly popular, with Black Isle Blonde available on tap and a Sunday roast that regularly sells out (be sure and book). The real draw is the shady beer garden (heated in winter), arguably the nicest in Edinburgh (0131 558 3134;cumberlandbar.co.uk).
What, you ask yourselves, is missing from Edinburgh's dance scene? Of course - a Polynesian Tiki themed nightclub! Thank goodness Lola Lo is here to meet that need. Offering a heady combination of cocktails, cheesy music and half a ton of raffia this tiny club is heaven for some - and hell for others. A favorite with office parties as well as hen and stag nights, the music selection is not wide, favoring current chart hits and classic pop. The dance floor is very small, but the atmosphere lively and the the drinks are reasonably priced for a city center club. (0131 2262224)
The Auld Reekie Tiki Bar
43B Frederick St
What, you ask yourselves, is missing from Edinburgh's dance scene? Of course - a Polynesian Tiki themed nightclub! Thank goodness Lola Lo is here to meet that need. Offering a heady combination of cocktails, cheesy music and half a ton of raffia this tiny club is heaven for some - and hell for others. A favorite with office parties as well as hen and stag nights, the music selection is not wide, favoring current chart hits and classic pop. The dance floor is very small, but the atmosphere lively and the the drinks are reasonably priced for a city center club. (0131 2262224)
This small venue can be found in the Edinburgh Art College and it offers a mixture of indie nights and live gigs. It may be small but it's also cheap, comfortable and has a great student vibe although it is not restricted to students. If you want indie or rock at knockdown prices and you don't mind a lot of students then The Wee Red Bar is worth a visit. There's a good range of club nights on here so if you pick the right time you'll find everything from punk to acid house. If you get here before midnight then you'll find entry is even cheaper, in fact this is a great club for anyone on a budget. (0131 651 5859)
The Wee Red Bar
74 Lauriston Place
This small venue can be found in the Edinburgh Art College and it offers a mixture of indie nights and live gigs. It may be small but it's also cheap, comfortable and has a great student vibe although it is not restricted to students. If you want indie or rock at knockdown prices and you don't mind a lot of students then The Wee Red Bar is worth a visit. There's a good range of club nights on here so if you pick the right time you'll find everything from punk to acid house. If you get here before midnight then you'll find entry is even cheaper, in fact this is a great club for anyone on a budget. (0131 651 5859)
This labyrinth club is very popular with students and it offers a couple of dance floors and several bar areas. It tends to be very cheap in comparison with most of the other clubbing options in the city but it is also loud, crowded and sweaty. The music is a mixture with an occasional live performance but generally you'll find pop and chart, indie and electro, rock and metal or drum and bass so check what's on before you go. It does get raucous so it definitely won't be to everyone's taste but it's good for a fun-seeking group on a budget. (0131 556 0444)
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The Hive Nightclub & Venue
15-17 Niddry St
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This labyrinth club is very popular with students and it offers a couple of dance floors and several bar areas. It tends to be very cheap in comparison with most of the other clubbing options in the city but it is also loud, crowded and sweaty. The music is a mixture with an occasional live performance but generally you'll find pop and chart, indie and electro, rock and metal or drum and bass so check what's on before you go. It does get raucous so it definitely won't be to everyone's taste but it's good for a fun-seeking group on a budget. (0131 556 0444)
This new venue is attached to The Liquid Room and shares the large smoking garden. Sometimes it acts for overspill for its bigger brother but it is also a club night venue in its own right offering a large dance floor, some great live DJ sets and a bar with a comfortable seating area complete with couches. It is a friendly club and for separate nights from The Liquid Room the entrance is from the Cowgate which can be a little tricky to find. If you are seeking a lively underground club scene experience then The Annexe is worth seeking out. (0131 225 2564)
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The Liquid Room
9C Victoria St
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This new venue is attached to The Liquid Room and shares the large smoking garden. Sometimes it acts for overspill for its bigger brother but it is also a club night venue in its own right offering a large dance floor, some great live DJ sets and a bar with a comfortable seating area complete with couches. It is a friendly club and for separate nights from The Liquid Room the entrance is from the Cowgate which can be a little tricky to find. If you are seeking a lively underground club scene experience then The Annexe is worth seeking out. (0131 225 2564)
If you like to get dressed up for a big night out and you're looking for a trendy venue then Lulu on George Street might just tempt you. The club is underneath the popular Tigerlily and it features a classic Saturday Night Fever style lighted dance floor. There are plenty of sofas and seating areas for a rest between dances and there's also a VIP area and private rooms for hire. You'll find the music is generally chart, house and RnB. It tends to get more expensive the later you go. Some people may find it a bit pretentious and it tends to attract a professional crowd. (0131 225 5005)
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Lulu Bar and Nightclub
125b George St
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If you like to get dressed up for a big night out and you're looking for a trendy venue then Lulu on George Street might just tempt you. The club is underneath the popular Tigerlily and it features a classic Saturday Night Fever style lighted dance floor. There are plenty of sofas and seating areas for a rest between dances and there's also a VIP area and private rooms for hire. You'll find the music is generally chart, house and RnB. It tends to get more expensive the later you go. Some people may find it a bit pretentious and it tends to attract a professional crowd. (0131 225 5005)
Studio 24 (previously known as Calton Studios) is an independent nightclub located at the foot of Calton Road close to Waverly Station and the Scottish Parliament. This Edinburgh institution has been the venue for an impressive range of live bands and great club nights for over two decades. The venue is dark and cavernous with relatively unadorned stone walls and floor. The lower level is dominated by the main bar and dance floor. Upstairs there is a smaller bar with its own diminutive dance floor and low atmospheric seating area. The range of alternative music showcased here is truly remarkable; everything from punk, rockabilly and industrial to funk, psychedelic and heavy metal. Entrance charges are generally very reasonably, and that combined with regular drinks promotions make this club very good value for money. (0131 558 3758)
Edinburgh Events
176 Rose St
Studio 24 (previously known as Calton Studios) is an independent nightclub located at the foot of Calton Road close to Waverly Station and the Scottish Parliament. This Edinburgh institution has been the venue for an impressive range of live bands and great club nights for over two decades. The venue is dark and cavernous with relatively unadorned stone walls and floor. The lower level is dominated by the main bar and dance floor. Upstairs there is a smaller bar with its own diminutive dance floor and low atmospheric seating area. The range of alternative music showcased here is truly remarkable; everything from punk, rockabilly and industrial to funk, psychedelic and heavy metal. Entrance charges are generally very reasonably, and that combined with regular drinks promotions make this club very good value for money. (0131 558 3758)
You'll find drum and bass, hip hop, electronica, funk and soul, house, disco and the occasional live gig at The Bongo Club. Club nights are regular and various different clubs run at this venue, so always make sure to check their website or Facebook page to see what's on before visiting. The club has recently moved to a new location, just off the Grassmarket under George IV Bridge, and seems to be settling in very happily. Leaving behind the rather shabby, but charming Moray House, the Bongo Club has found a new confidence and it's a great place to dance the night away. (0131 558 7604)
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The Bongo Club
66 Cowgate
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You'll find drum and bass, hip hop, electronica, funk and soul, house, disco and the occasional live gig at The Bongo Club. Club nights are regular and various different clubs run at this venue, so always make sure to check their website or Facebook page to see what's on before visiting. The club has recently moved to a new location, just off the Grassmarket under George IV Bridge, and seems to be settling in very happily. Leaving behind the rather shabby, but charming Moray House, the Bongo Club has found a new confidence and it's a great place to dance the night away. (0131 558 7604)
Just off the Royal Mile, Cabaret Voltaire has long been one of the best underground dance clubs in Edinburgh. With a string of popular DJs playing sets to packed dance floors it has always been a popular venue with locals. A friendly atmosphere and great music made it one of the top choices for most clubbers in the area. With a warren of cavernous caves, a plethora of comfortable booths, surprisingly reasonably priced drinks, and a great chill-out room, it ticks all of the boxes for a great night out. It is open from noon and offers a stylish bar environment with club nights running until 3AM. (0131 247 4704)
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Cabaret Voltaire
36-38 Blair St
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Just off the Royal Mile, Cabaret Voltaire has long been one of the best underground dance clubs in Edinburgh. With a string of popular DJs playing sets to packed dance floors it has always been a popular venue with locals. A friendly atmosphere and great music made it one of the top choices for most clubbers in the area. With a warren of cavernous caves, a plethora of comfortable booths, surprisingly reasonably priced drinks, and a great chill-out room, it ticks all of the boxes for a great night out. It is open from noon and offers a stylish bar environment with club nights running until 3AM. (0131 247 4704)
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Boteco Do Brasil
47 Lothian St
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Sightseeing
The Royal Mile refers to the road linking Edinburgh Castle and the Palace of Holyroodhouse. Lined with charming townhouses and historic landmarks, this splendid thoroughfare is a great first stop in Edinburgh with its fine shops (including kilt makers), numerous inns, museums, cafés and restaurants. Many of the buildings are tall, averaging six to 15-stories and referred to locally as "lands". Narrow little alleys, called "winds" with the hidden backyards "closes", weave in and around them. Some of the most popular attractions are to be found at the upper end of the Royal Mile - commonly called Castle Hill - and include Outlook Tower and the Camera Obscura with its outstanding views; the Tolbooth (St John's Highland Church) with the city's tallest church tower; Gladstone's Land, a six-story merchant's house with pretty ceiling paintings and original furniture; and Lady Stair's Close, home to the Writer's Museum displaying manuscripts, portraits, etchings and memorabilia of the poet Robert Burns and writers Sir Walter Scott and Robert Louis Stevenson.
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Royal Mile
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The Royal Mile refers to the road linking Edinburgh Castle and the Palace of Holyroodhouse. Lined with charming townhouses and historic landmarks, this splendid thoroughfare is a great first stop in Edinburgh with its fine shops (including kilt makers), numerous inns, museums, cafés and restaurants. Many of the buildings are tall, averaging six to 15-stories and referred to locally as "lands". Narrow little alleys, called "winds" with the hidden backyards "closes", weave in and around them. Some of the most popular attractions are to be found at the upper end of the Royal Mile - commonly called Castle Hill - and include Outlook Tower and the Camera Obscura with its outstanding views; the Tolbooth (St John's Highland Church) with the city's tallest church tower; Gladstone's Land, a six-story merchant's house with pretty ceiling paintings and original furniture; and Lady Stair's Close, home to the Writer's Museum displaying manuscripts, portraits, etchings and memorabilia of the poet Robert Burns and writers Sir Walter Scott and Robert Louis Stevenson.
Scotland's most famous landmark, Edinburgh Castle is one of Britain's most visited tourist attractions. Highlights include the One O'clock Salute from Half Moon Battery (cannon fire commemorates the tradition of helping ships synchronize their clocks); the impressive Scottish National War Memorial; and the stunning collection of Crown Jewels housed in the Royal Palace. Another notable feature is the Stone of Destiny (aka, the Stone of Scone), famously stolen by Edward I and placed under the English throne in London - only returned to Scotland 700 years later in 1996.
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Edinburgh Castle
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Scotland's most famous landmark, Edinburgh Castle is one of Britain's most visited tourist attractions. Highlights include the One O'clock Salute from Half Moon Battery (cannon fire commemorates the tradition of helping ships synchronize their clocks); the impressive Scottish National War Memorial; and the stunning collection of Crown Jewels housed in the Royal Palace. Another notable feature is the Stone of Destiny (aka, the Stone of Scone), famously stolen by Edward I and placed under the English throne in London - only returned to Scotland 700 years later in 1996.
The Palace of Holyroodhouse is the Queen's official Edinburgh residence and has frequently been at the center of Scottish history: it was where James II and James IV were each married, where James V and Charles I were crowned, and where "Bonnie Prince Charlie" held court in 1745. When the Queen's away, public access is permitted to the stunning Historic Apartments (former home of Mary Queen of Scots) and the State Apartments, famous for their fine furnishings, tapestries and plasterwork. The Great Gallery is also worthy of a mention with its portraits of Scottish kings, both legendary and real. Tours are also available of neighboring 12th century Holyrood Abbey, founded by King David I. Afterwards, be sure to snap a shot of the lovely Holyroodhouse Fountain outside the palace.
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Palace of Holyroodhouse
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The Palace of Holyroodhouse is the Queen's official Edinburgh residence and has frequently been at the center of Scottish history: it was where James II and James IV were each married, where James V and Charles I were crowned, and where "Bonnie Prince Charlie" held court in 1745. When the Queen's away, public access is permitted to the stunning Historic Apartments (former home of Mary Queen of Scots) and the State Apartments, famous for their fine furnishings, tapestries and plasterwork. The Great Gallery is also worthy of a mention with its portraits of Scottish kings, both legendary and real. Tours are also available of neighboring 12th century Holyrood Abbey, founded by King David I. Afterwards, be sure to snap a shot of the lovely Holyroodhouse Fountain outside the palace.
At 820 ft, Arthur's Seat is the highest point in the 640-acre Holyrood Park. The spectacular sightseeing views from the top encompass the whole city all the way to the mouth of the Forth. (The easiest way up is from the park's Dunsapie Loch.) Also an easy climb are the dramatic Salisbury Crags, a series of 151 ft cliffs adjacent to Arthur's Seat. Other features in this huge park are the ancient cultivation terraces - some of the earliest and best-preserved examples of ancient farming practices in Scotland, and the picturesque ruins of the medieval St Anthony's Chapel.
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Парк Холируд
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At 820 ft, Arthur's Seat is the highest point in the 640-acre Holyrood Park. The spectacular sightseeing views from the top encompass the whole city all the way to the mouth of the Forth. (The easiest way up is from the park's Dunsapie Loch.) Also an easy climb are the dramatic Salisbury Crags, a series of 151 ft cliffs adjacent to Arthur's Seat. Other features in this huge park are the ancient cultivation terraces - some of the earliest and best-preserved examples of ancient farming practices in Scotland, and the picturesque ruins of the medieval St Anthony's Chapel.
Consecrated in 1243, St Giles Cathedral is Edinburgh's principal church. The 161 ft central tower with its eight arched buttresses forms a huge crown (the Crown Steeple) and is a favorite backdrop for photos. Interior highlights include memorials to the dead of WWI, lovely stained glass windows, and a statue of John Knox, leader of the Protestant Reformation (his former home, 45 High St, is close by and contains a museum and related artifacts). The Thistle Chapel is known for its marvelous oak carvings, heraldic emblems and seals of the "Knights of the Thistle" (Scotland's oldest order of knights). Sir Robert Lorimer designed the chapel in 1911, and it is a superb example of modern Gothic style.
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St Giles' Cathedral
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Consecrated in 1243, St Giles Cathedral is Edinburgh's principal church. The 161 ft central tower with its eight arched buttresses forms a huge crown (the Crown Steeple) and is a favorite backdrop for photos. Interior highlights include memorials to the dead of WWI, lovely stained glass windows, and a statue of John Knox, leader of the Protestant Reformation (his former home, 45 High St, is close by and contains a museum and related artifacts). The Thistle Chapel is known for its marvelous oak carvings, heraldic emblems and seals of the "Knights of the Thistle" (Scotland's oldest order of knights). Sir Robert Lorimer designed the chapel in 1911, and it is a superb example of modern Gothic style.
Edinburgh's Royal Botanic Garden is the second oldest such garden in Britain. Within its magnificent 70-acres are a herbarium and Britain's biggest palm house, a tropical house with exotic orchids, an alpine house, a terraced moorland garden, a heather garden, and an extensive arboretum with rare giant trees from the Himalayas, North America and China. Other highlights are the woodland garden with its colorful azaleas, hydrangeas, camellias and rhododendrons; an aquatic house with tropical water plants such as the pink water lily from India; and touring displays in the Exhibition Hall. Hours: Daily, 10am-5pm Admission: Garden - Free; Glasshoues - Adults, £5; Children (15 and under), Free Address: 20A Inverleith Row, Edinburgh Official site: www.rbge.org.uk
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Ройал Ботаник Гарден Эдинбург
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Edinburgh's Royal Botanic Garden is the second oldest such garden in Britain. Within its magnificent 70-acres are a herbarium and Britain's biggest palm house, a tropical house with exotic orchids, an alpine house, a terraced moorland garden, a heather garden, and an extensive arboretum with rare giant trees from the Himalayas, North America and China. Other highlights are the woodland garden with its colorful azaleas, hydrangeas, camellias and rhododendrons; an aquatic house with tropical water plants such as the pink water lily from India; and touring displays in the Exhibition Hall. Hours: Daily, 10am-5pm Admission: Garden - Free; Glasshoues - Adults, £5; Children (15 and under), Free Address: 20A Inverleith Row, Edinburgh Official site: www.rbge.org.uk
Busy Princes Street is Edinburgh New Town's main thoroughfare. It extends for almost a mile and is lined with colorful gardens and elegant shops, including the tradition-conscious Jenners of Edinburgh, the world's oldest independent department store. House of Frasers at the western end is also quite grand, while Princes Mall with its small shops set among fountains and cafés offers goods of varying quality. As well as these temples to consumerism, Princes Street boasts several reputable hotels and restaurants, from fast food to gourmet bistros. Of interest to those keen on genealogy is New Register House, home to the Scottish National Archives, some of which date from the 13th century. Princes Street's historic landmarks include the 200 ft tall Sir Walter Scott Monument, and the David Livingstone Memorial, a memorial to the missionary and African explorer. When you're done with all that shopping and history, head for Princes Street Gardens - home to the world's oldest floral clock (1903).
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Принсес-стрит
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Busy Princes Street is Edinburgh New Town's main thoroughfare. It extends for almost a mile and is lined with colorful gardens and elegant shops, including the tradition-conscious Jenners of Edinburgh, the world's oldest independent department store. House of Frasers at the western end is also quite grand, while Princes Mall with its small shops set among fountains and cafés offers goods of varying quality. As well as these temples to consumerism, Princes Street boasts several reputable hotels and restaurants, from fast food to gourmet bistros. Of interest to those keen on genealogy is New Register House, home to the Scottish National Archives, some of which date from the 13th century. Princes Street's historic landmarks include the 200 ft tall Sir Walter Scott Monument, and the David Livingstone Memorial, a memorial to the missionary and African explorer. When you're done with all that shopping and history, head for Princes Street Gardens - home to the world's oldest floral clock (1903).
One of Edinburgh's newest attractions is the Royal Yacht Britannia. Over the years, this luxurious vessel has hosted numerous famous people from around the world, although none perhaps as famous as the Queen. After more than 40 years serving the Royal Family, the 60-year-old vessel was sent to Leith, Edinburgh's port area, as the centerpiece of the Britannia Visitor Centre. Once aboard, you'll learn about the history of this and other Royal Yachts as you explore the ship's five main decks. Highlights include the Royal Apartments and bedrooms, the lovely sun lounge, and the onboard Royal Deck Tea Room. Hours: Daily, 9:30am-4:30pm Admission: Adults, £12.75; Children (5-17), £7.75 Address: Ocean Dr, Leith, Edinburgh Official site: www.royalyachtbritannia.co.uk
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Royal Yacht Britannia
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One of Edinburgh's newest attractions is the Royal Yacht Britannia. Over the years, this luxurious vessel has hosted numerous famous people from around the world, although none perhaps as famous as the Queen. After more than 40 years serving the Royal Family, the 60-year-old vessel was sent to Leith, Edinburgh's port area, as the centerpiece of the Britannia Visitor Centre. Once aboard, you'll learn about the history of this and other Royal Yachts as you explore the ship's five main decks. Highlights include the Royal Apartments and bedrooms, the lovely sun lounge, and the onboard Royal Deck Tea Room. Hours: Daily, 9:30am-4:30pm Admission: Adults, £12.75; Children (5-17), £7.75 Address: Ocean Dr, Leith, Edinburgh Official site: www.royalyachtbritannia.co.uk
Located at the south end of picturesque Candlemakers Row, Greyfriars Church boasts the city's oldest graveyard that serves as the final resting place for a number of celebrated Scots, including poet Allan Ramsay (1686-1758). The first "National Covenant", directed against Charles I's attempt to impose the constitution of the Anglican church on Scotland, was signed here in 1638, under which framework, the Church would be subjected to the power of the state. Buried within the Covenanters Prison is James Hutton, considered by many as the father of modern geology. Perhaps the most famous name associated with the church, however, is Greyfriars Bobby. In 1858 this Skye terrier loyally followed the coffin of his master, John Gray, to the graveyard and until his death 14 years later refused to leave. A kennel was built for him to shelter in, and a famous landmark outside the church is a statue of Bobby erected in 1873. Hours: 10:30am-4:30pm Admission: Free Address: 1 Greyfriars, Edinburgh Official site: www.greyfriarskirk.com
Церковь францисканцев
1 Greyfriars
Located at the south end of picturesque Candlemakers Row, Greyfriars Church boasts the city's oldest graveyard that serves as the final resting place for a number of celebrated Scots, including poet Allan Ramsay (1686-1758). The first "National Covenant", directed against Charles I's attempt to impose the constitution of the Anglican church on Scotland, was signed here in 1638, under which framework, the Church would be subjected to the power of the state. Buried within the Covenanters Prison is James Hutton, considered by many as the father of modern geology. Perhaps the most famous name associated with the church, however, is Greyfriars Bobby. In 1858 this Skye terrier loyally followed the coffin of his master, John Gray, to the graveyard and until his death 14 years later refused to leave. A kennel was built for him to shelter in, and a famous landmark outside the church is a statue of Bobby erected in 1873. Hours: 10:30am-4:30pm Admission: Free Address: 1 Greyfriars, Edinburgh Official site: www.greyfriarskirk.com
Arts & Culture
Since opening in 2011, the National Museum has become one of Scotland's most popular attractions with close to two million visitors each year. It incorporates collections from a number of Edinburgh's older museums. Highlights include national archaeological collections, medieval artifacts, plus displays focusing on natural history, geology, art, science and technology. Among the 16 galleries, the most interesting of more than 8,000 artifacts on display include Dolly the sheep, the world's first cloned mammal, as well as some of Elton John's more elaborate stage costumes. Traditional museum displays include material from Ancient Egypt, and the infamous Maiden, an early form of guillotine. Hours: Daily, 10am-5pm Admission: Free Address: Chambers St, Edinburgh Official site: www.nms.ac.uk
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Национальный музей Шотландии
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Since opening in 2011, the National Museum has become one of Scotland's most popular attractions with close to two million visitors each year. It incorporates collections from a number of Edinburgh's older museums. Highlights include national archaeological collections, medieval artifacts, plus displays focusing on natural history, geology, art, science and technology. Among the 16 galleries, the most interesting of more than 8,000 artifacts on display include Dolly the sheep, the world's first cloned mammal, as well as some of Elton John's more elaborate stage costumes. Traditional museum displays include material from Ancient Egypt, and the infamous Maiden, an early form of guillotine. Hours: Daily, 10am-5pm Admission: Free Address: Chambers St, Edinburgh Official site: www.nms.ac.uk
Paintings of Scotland's leading historic figures from the 16th century to the present day can be seen in the National Portrait Gallery, one of Edinburgh's three major art galleries. The highlight of the gallery's 65,000-plus pieces is the huge processional frieze showing Scotland's most famous personalities, including Robbie Burns, Sir Walter Scott, Sean Connery, Robert Louis Stevenson, Mary Stuart and Bonnie Prince Charlie, among others. The second major art collection is housed in the Scottish National Gallery, which boasts Scotland's biggest collection of European paintings and sculptures, beginning with the Renaissance and including some Post-Impressionists. Finally, the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art displays paintings by Henry Matisse and Pablo Picasso, surrealistic works by Rene Magritte, Joan Miró and Max Ernst, contemporary paintings by Bruce McLean, Callum Innes and Gwen Hardie, and sculptures by Henry Moore, Barbara Hepworth and David Hockney. It's a lot of art (and walking), so you may want to spread your visits over a couple of days. Hours: Daily, 10am-5pm Admission: Free Address: The Mound, Edinburgh Official site: https://www.nationalgalleries.org/
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Шотландский национальный музей современного искусства
75 Belford Rd
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Paintings of Scotland's leading historic figures from the 16th century to the present day can be seen in the National Portrait Gallery, one of Edinburgh's three major art galleries. The highlight of the gallery's 65,000-plus pieces is the huge processional frieze showing Scotland's most famous personalities, including Robbie Burns, Sir Walter Scott, Sean Connery, Robert Louis Stevenson, Mary Stuart and Bonnie Prince Charlie, among others. The second major art collection is housed in the Scottish National Gallery, which boasts Scotland's biggest collection of European paintings and sculptures, beginning with the Renaissance and including some Post-Impressionists. Finally, the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art displays paintings by Henry Matisse and Pablo Picasso, surrealistic works by Rene Magritte, Joan Miró and Max Ernst, contemporary paintings by Bruce McLean, Callum Innes and Gwen Hardie, and sculptures by Henry Moore, Barbara Hepworth and David Hockney. It's a lot of art (and walking), so you may want to spread your visits over a couple of days. Hours: Daily, 10am-5pm Admission: Free Address: The Mound, Edinburgh Official site: https://www.nationalgalleries.org/
On George IV Bridge stands the National Library of Scotland, one of the largest libraries in Britain. Established around the collection of the former Advocate's Library in 1689, the library receives a copy of every book published in the UK. Notable features - apart from its huge book collection - are the seven figures in the entrance symbolizing different teaching methods. As well as its permanent exhibition on Scottish history, the library also houses touring exhibitions on historical themes. A popular stop for those with an interest in genealogy, the National Library is also a major European research library, and visitors are welcome to obtain a library card in order to review material in the facility's private reading rooms. Address: George IV Bridge, Edinburgh Official site: www.nls.uk
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National Library of Scotland
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On George IV Bridge stands the National Library of Scotland, one of the largest libraries in Britain. Established around the collection of the former Advocate's Library in 1689, the library receives a copy of every book published in the UK. Notable features - apart from its huge book collection - are the seven figures in the entrance symbolizing different teaching methods. As well as its permanent exhibition on Scottish history, the library also houses touring exhibitions on historical themes. A popular stop for those with an interest in genealogy, the National Library is also a major European research library, and visitors are welcome to obtain a library card in order to review material in the facility's private reading rooms. Address: George IV Bridge, Edinburgh Official site: www.nls.uk
Fun for kids of all ages, the Museum of Childhood includes excellent collections of old toys including model railroads, dolls and games from around the world. But it's more than just a place full of old toys (as much fun as they are): the museum explores other aspects of growing up, including a fun look at schooldays, trends and fashions. Adding to the authenticity is a re-creation of a Victorian streetscape complete with outdoor toys, as well as an opportunity to dress up in period costumes and play the kinds of games our ancestors would have enjoyed. Hours: Mon-Sat, 10am-5pm; Sun, 12pm-5pm Admission: Free (Donations are welcome) Address: 42 High St, Edinburgh Official site: www.edinburghmuseums.org.uk/Venues/Museum-of-Childhood
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Museum of Childhood
42 High St
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Fun for kids of all ages, the Museum of Childhood includes excellent collections of old toys including model railroads, dolls and games from around the world. But it's more than just a place full of old toys (as much fun as they are): the museum explores other aspects of growing up, including a fun look at schooldays, trends and fashions. Adding to the authenticity is a re-creation of a Victorian streetscape complete with outdoor toys, as well as an opportunity to dress up in period costumes and play the kinds of games our ancestors would have enjoyed. Hours: Mon-Sat, 10am-5pm; Sun, 12pm-5pm Admission: Free (Donations are welcome) Address: 42 High St, Edinburgh Official site: www.edinburghmuseums.org.uk/Venues/Museum-of-Childhood
Parks & Nature
Calton Hill provides a panoramic view of the city that should not be missed. To the west lie Princes Street and the castle, to the south the old town is silhouetted against Arthur's Seat. And in the east and north, the Firth of Forth and the docks at Leith are clearly visible. At the foot of the hill stands the 13th century Royal High School, where Sir Walter Scott was once a pupil. Opposite Calton Hill stands a memorial to Scottish poet Robert Burns, a favorite of Edinburgh's highest social circles. Perhaps the most important of Edinburgh's many memorials is the impressive National Monument on Calton Hill, erected to remember the dead from the Napoleonic Wars. Henry Playfair designed the memorial using the Parthenon in Athens as his inspiration and work began in 1822, but the project had to be abandoned due to lack of money. Also of note here is Nelson's Monument, unveiled in 1816 after Horatio Nelson's victory at the Battle of Trafalgar.
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Calton Hill
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Calton Hill provides a panoramic view of the city that should not be missed. To the west lie Princes Street and the castle, to the south the old town is silhouetted against Arthur's Seat. And in the east and north, the Firth of Forth and the docks at Leith are clearly visible. At the foot of the hill stands the 13th century Royal High School, where Sir Walter Scott was once a pupil. Opposite Calton Hill stands a memorial to Scottish poet Robert Burns, a favorite of Edinburgh's highest social circles. Perhaps the most important of Edinburgh's many memorials is the impressive National Monument on Calton Hill, erected to remember the dead from the Napoleonic Wars. Henry Playfair designed the memorial using the Parthenon in Athens as his inspiration and work began in 1822, but the project had to be abandoned due to lack of money. Also of note here is Nelson's Monument, unveiled in 1816 after Horatio Nelson's victory at the Battle of Trafalgar.
Getting Around
Take number 2 or 22 to go down town.
Whitson Grove
Take number 2 or 22 to go down town.
Whitson Grove