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Guidebook for Tel Aviv

Natan

Guidebook for Tel Aviv

Parks & Nature
Great beach 13 min Walking with wonderful promenade, and really nice restaurant right on the beach.
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Tel Baruch Beach
19
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Great beach 13 min Walking with wonderful promenade, and really nice restaurant right on the beach.
Extensive lawns, sports facilities, botanical gardens, an aviary, a water park, two outdoor concert venues and lakes.
184
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Парк Яркон
184
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Extensive lawns, sports facilities, botanical gardens, an aviary, a water park, two outdoor concert venues and lakes.
Beautiful Lake
22
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Яркон
22
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Beautiful Lake
My favorite beach ;)
12
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Metzitzim Beach
12
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My favorite beach ;)
Hilton Beach
55
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Hilton Beach
55
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Hilton Beach
Yarkon Park (Hebrew: פארק הירקון‎, Park HaYarkon) is the largest park in Tel Aviv, Israel, with about sixteen million visits annually. Bounded by Rokach Boulevard on the north and Bavli on the south, the park includes extensive lawns, sports facilities, botanical gardens, an aviary, a water park, two outdoor concert venues and lakes.
Ganei Yehoshu'a
Yarkon Park (Hebrew: פארק הירקון‎, Park HaYarkon) is the largest park in Tel Aviv, Israel, with about sixteen million visits annually. Bounded by Rokach Boulevard on the north and Bavli on the south, the park includes extensive lawns, sports facilities, botanical gardens, an aviary, a water park, two outdoor concert venues and lakes.
Shopping
"Ramat Aviv Mall" The Best Mall In Israel with the best brands. Approximately 24,000 people visit the mall each day and it is considered one of the most successful malls 10 Seconds Walking from the apartment !!
Ramat Aviv Mall/Einstein
"Ramat Aviv Mall" The Best Mall In Israel with the best brands. Approximately 24,000 people visit the mall each day and it is considered one of the most successful malls 10 Seconds Walking from the apartment !!
Kikar HaMedina Around the plaza, which was designed by architect Oscar Niemeyer (in cooperation with Israeli architects who planned for the existing residential buildings), there is a circular street, He Be'Iyar Street (Israeli Independence Day Street), connecting with two major streets: the north–south Weizmann Street, and the east–west Jabotinsky Street, as well as a number of small streets. The square itself is currently the site of a large, poorly maintained park, however various plans to demolish it and build large shopping centres and luxury towers have faltered due to local opposition. In the 1960s, circuses moved into the sandy square coming to perform. In the early 1970s extensive construction activity began around He BeIyar Street, which established a uniform design and luxury buildings. Many of these buildings have luxury stores and international designer shops located on the first floor, which have made it one of the most expensive areas in Tel Aviv. On 3 September, 2011, Kikar Hamedina was the gathering place for the 'March of the Million', the culminating demonstration of the 2011 Israeli social justice protests. The demonstration was the largest in Israel's history, with approximately 300,000 people marching on the square, and 100,000 demonstrating in other locations across Israel.
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Kikar Hamedina
35
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Kikar HaMedina Around the plaza, which was designed by architect Oscar Niemeyer (in cooperation with Israeli architects who planned for the existing residential buildings), there is a circular street, He Be'Iyar Street (Israeli Independence Day Street), connecting with two major streets: the north–south Weizmann Street, and the east–west Jabotinsky Street, as well as a number of small streets. The square itself is currently the site of a large, poorly maintained park, however various plans to demolish it and build large shopping centres and luxury towers have faltered due to local opposition. In the 1960s, circuses moved into the sandy square coming to perform. In the early 1970s extensive construction activity began around He BeIyar Street, which established a uniform design and luxury buildings. Many of these buildings have luxury stores and international designer shops located on the first floor, which have made it one of the most expensive areas in Tel Aviv. On 3 September, 2011, Kikar Hamedina was the gathering place for the 'March of the Million', the culminating demonstration of the 2011 Israeli social justice protests. The demonstration was the largest in Israel's history, with approximately 300,000 people marching on the square, and 100,000 demonstrating in other locations across Israel.
Azrieli Center (Hebrew: מֶרְכָּז עַזְרִיאֵלִי; Merkaz Azrieli) is a complex of skyscrapers in Tel Aviv. At the base of the center lies a large shopping mall. The Azrieli Center is located on a 34,500 m2 (371,000 sq ft) site in Tel Aviv, Israel, which was previously used as Tel Aviv's dumpster-truck parking garage. The $350,000,000 project revitalized the area. The Azrieli Center Mall is one of the largest in Israel. There are about 30 restaurants, fast-food counters, cafes and food stands in the mall. The top floor of the mall is a popular hangout spot for teens, and many online message boards arrange get-togethers there during national holidays.
קניון עזריאלי
132 Derech Menachem Begin
Azrieli Center (Hebrew: מֶרְכָּז עַזְרִיאֵלִי; Merkaz Azrieli) is a complex of skyscrapers in Tel Aviv. At the base of the center lies a large shopping mall. The Azrieli Center is located on a 34,500 m2 (371,000 sq ft) site in Tel Aviv, Israel, which was previously used as Tel Aviv's dumpster-truck parking garage. The $350,000,000 project revitalized the area. The Azrieli Center Mall is one of the largest in Israel. There are about 30 restaurants, fast-food counters, cafes and food stands in the mall. The top floor of the mall is a popular hangout spot for teens, and many online message boards arrange get-togethers there during national holidays.
The Carmel Market, or Shuk HaCarmel, is the most famous of all Tel Aviv’s marketplaces. In recent years, it’s even joined the ranks of Tel Aviv’s trendy spots for bars, restaurants, coffee shops and chef-owned food stalls. It’s no wonder Shuk HaCarmel is Tel Aviv’s largest and most-centrally located shuk: From hand-made Jachnun, a traditional Yemenite dish, to boutique cheeses, and from one-off cotton clothes to designer threads, HaCarmel has it all. Plan your visit around your tastebuds and food preferences - salted fish, cured meats, Middle Eastern fare, fresh baked French pastries, and local-roasted coffee or fresh-pressed fruit or vegetable juice blends to wash it all down.
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Carmel Market
145
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The Carmel Market, or Shuk HaCarmel, is the most famous of all Tel Aviv’s marketplaces. In recent years, it’s even joined the ranks of Tel Aviv’s trendy spots for bars, restaurants, coffee shops and chef-owned food stalls. It’s no wonder Shuk HaCarmel is Tel Aviv’s largest and most-centrally located shuk: From hand-made Jachnun, a traditional Yemenite dish, to boutique cheeses, and from one-off cotton clothes to designer threads, HaCarmel has it all. Plan your visit around your tastebuds and food preferences - salted fish, cured meats, Middle Eastern fare, fresh baked French pastries, and local-roasted coffee or fresh-pressed fruit or vegetable juice blends to wash it all down.
The mall has around 420 stores, one movie theater, restaurants, an internet cafe, a design center holding exhibitions from around the world (Soho), specialty stores (Comic books, video games, gadgets, stamp-collecting, posters), a rooftop swimming pool and two gyms. The mall also hosts weekly events. Every Friday (except for Jewish holidays) the mall hosts the "Food Fair", Israel's largest food festival, with foods from a large variety of cuisines. On Thursdays and Fridays it hosts a designers boutique, which includes fashion and jewelry from 40 designers. Also on Thursdays and Fridays, it hosts an "Alternative therapies fair". The mall is visited by about 20,000 people on weekdays, around 45,000 people on Fridays, and about 80,000 during the holidays.
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Дизенгофф
50 Dizengoff St
199
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The mall has around 420 stores, one movie theater, restaurants, an internet cafe, a design center holding exhibitions from around the world (Soho), specialty stores (Comic books, video games, gadgets, stamp-collecting, posters), a rooftop swimming pool and two gyms. The mall also hosts weekly events. Every Friday (except for Jewish holidays) the mall hosts the "Food Fair", Israel's largest food festival, with foods from a large variety of cuisines. On Thursdays and Fridays it hosts a designers boutique, which includes fashion and jewelry from 40 designers. Also on Thursdays and Fridays, it hosts an "Alternative therapies fair". The mall is visited by about 20,000 people on weekdays, around 45,000 people on Fridays, and about 80,000 during the holidays.
Entertainment & Activities
Best Sport Center. Olympic Pool 2 pools, jacuzzi, yoga pilates... etc
Sport Center TAU
Best Sport Center. Olympic Pool 2 pools, jacuzzi, yoga pilates... etc
The amusement park is such a magical place! Just the thought of it brings up waves of nostalgia, innocent childhood memories and sensations of true happiness and freedom. The Tel Aviv Luna Park, with endless attractions and adventures, can be a thrilling and fascinating experience for everyone, big and small! A visit to the Luna Park is an opportunity for the whole family – mom, dad and even grandma and grandpa – to experience together the atmosphere of freedom and liberating childhood once again. Inside the Luna Park one can find dozens of unique rides for the big and small, suitable for a wide range of ages – from preschoolers to the elderly, and even for the more courageous of the bunch. The Luna Park is an excellent choice of entertainment for weekends, holidays
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לונה פארק תל אביב
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The amusement park is such a magical place! Just the thought of it brings up waves of nostalgia, innocent childhood memories and sensations of true happiness and freedom. The Tel Aviv Luna Park, with endless attractions and adventures, can be a thrilling and fascinating experience for everyone, big and small! A visit to the Luna Park is an opportunity for the whole family – mom, dad and even grandma and grandpa – to experience together the atmosphere of freedom and liberating childhood once again. Inside the Luna Park one can find dozens of unique rides for the big and small, suitable for a wide range of ages – from preschoolers to the elderly, and even for the more courageous of the bunch. The Luna Park is an excellent choice of entertainment for weekends, holidays
A visit to the planetarium offers visitors, who sit on a revolving stage, an extraordinary "flight" based on the film "Astronaut" (produced by the National Space Centre of Leicester, England).
Planetarium
2 Chaim Levanon St
A visit to the planetarium offers visitors, who sit on a revolving stage, an extraordinary "flight" based on the film "Astronaut" (produced by the National Space Centre of Leicester, England).
"Sportek" Extensive lawns, sports facilities and lakes.
Sportek/Rokach Blvd
"Sportek" Extensive lawns, sports facilities and lakes.
Cinema City
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سينماء سيتي
11
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Cinema City
Arts & Culture
The museum traces the history of communities of the Jewish diaspora through the ages and throughout the world, telling the story of the Jewish people.
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Музей Диаспоры
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The museum traces the history of communities of the Jewish diaspora through the ages and throughout the world, telling the story of the Jewish people.
Palmach Museum 10 Minuts Walking
Музей Пальмах
10 חיים לבנון
Palmach Museum 10 Minuts Walking
The Eretz Israel Museum, Tel Aviv, is a multidisciplinary museum that focuses on the history and culture of Israel through comprehensive permanent and temporary exhibits in the diverse fields of archeology, ethnography, post and philately, folklore, Judaica, traditional crafts, and popular art, cultural history, and local identity. The museum, which is one of the third largest in Israel, is spread over an area of some 20 acres, and comprises about 15 buildings and various installations. Hundreds of thousands of items are housed in the diverse museum collections, among them numerous and rare treasures.
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Музей государства Израиль
2 Chaim Levanon St
22
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The Eretz Israel Museum, Tel Aviv, is a multidisciplinary museum that focuses on the history and culture of Israel through comprehensive permanent and temporary exhibits in the diverse fields of archeology, ethnography, post and philately, folklore, Judaica, traditional crafts, and popular art, cultural history, and local identity. The museum, which is one of the third largest in Israel, is spread over an area of some 20 acres, and comprises about 15 buildings and various installations. Hundreds of thousands of items are housed in the diverse museum collections, among them numerous and rare treasures.
The Tel Aviv Museum of Art (Hebrew: מוזיאון תל אביב לאמנות‎ Muze'on Tel Aviv Lamanut) is an art museum in Tel Aviv, Israel. It was established in 1932 in a building that was the home of Tel Aviv's first mayor, Meir Dizengoff. The Helena Rubinstein Pavilion for Contemporary Art opened in 1959. The museum moved to its current location on King Saul Avenue in 1971. Another wing was added in 1999 and the Lola Beer Ebner Sculpture Garden was established.[1] The museum also contains "The Joseph and Rebecca Meyerhoff Art Education Center", opened since 1988. The museum houses a comprehensive collection of classical and contemporary art, especially Israeli art, a sculpture garden and a youth wing. The Museum's collection represents some of the leading artists of the first half of the 20th century and many of the major movements of modern art in this period: Fauvism, German Expressionism, Cubism, Futurism, Russian Constructivism, the De Stijl movement and Surrealism, French art, from the Impressionists and Post- Impressionists to the School of Paris including works of Chaim Soutine, and key works by Pablo Picasso from the Blue and Neo-Classical Period to his Late Period, and Surrealists works of Joan Miró. The Collection includes several masterpieces, among them the painting Friedericke Maria Beer, 1916 by the Austrian artist Gustav Klimt and Untitled Improvisation V, 1914, by the Russian master Wassily Kandinsky.
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Тель-Авивский музей изобразительных искусств
27 שדרות שאול המלך
132
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The Tel Aviv Museum of Art (Hebrew: מוזיאון תל אביב לאמנות‎ Muze'on Tel Aviv Lamanut) is an art museum in Tel Aviv, Israel. It was established in 1932 in a building that was the home of Tel Aviv's first mayor, Meir Dizengoff. The Helena Rubinstein Pavilion for Contemporary Art opened in 1959. The museum moved to its current location on King Saul Avenue in 1971. Another wing was added in 1999 and the Lola Beer Ebner Sculpture Garden was established.[1] The museum also contains "The Joseph and Rebecca Meyerhoff Art Education Center", opened since 1988. The museum houses a comprehensive collection of classical and contemporary art, especially Israeli art, a sculpture garden and a youth wing. The Museum's collection represents some of the leading artists of the first half of the 20th century and many of the major movements of modern art in this period: Fauvism, German Expressionism, Cubism, Futurism, Russian Constructivism, the De Stijl movement and Surrealism, French art, from the Impressionists and Post- Impressionists to the School of Paris including works of Chaim Soutine, and key works by Pablo Picasso from the Blue and Neo-Classical Period to his Late Period, and Surrealists works of Joan Miró. The Collection includes several masterpieces, among them the painting Friedericke Maria Beer, 1916 by the Austrian artist Gustav Klimt and Untitled Improvisation V, 1914, by the Russian master Wassily Kandinsky.
The Habima Theatre (תיאטורון הבימה - Teat'ron HaBima, lit. "The Stage Theatre") is the national theatre of Israel and one of the first Hebrew language theatres. It is located in Habima Square in the center of Tel Aviv Habima was founded by Nahum Zemach in Białystok (then in Grodno Governorate, Russia) in 1912. Menahem Gnessin was one of its cofounders and early actors. Because its performances were in Hebrew and it dealt with issues of the Jewish people, it met with persecution by the Czarist government. Beginning in 1918, it operated under the auspices of the Moscow Art Theatre, which some consider its true beginning. It encountered difficulties under the Soviet government as well after the Russian Revolution. Stanislavski arranged for the mainly Jewish Polish actors to be trained by Yevgeny Vakhtangov. The People's Commissar for Nationalities Affairs, Joseph Stalin, also authorized the theatre's creation. In 1926, the theatre left the Soviet Union to tour abroad, including in the United States. Zemach and some actors stayed in New York City, where their productions had met with success. Their productions included plays from the Jewish folk tradition, and they were performed in Hebrew. The company split up, with some members choosing to stay in New York. Habima has been officially considered the national theatre of Israel since 1958, the year in which it received the Israel Prize for theatre. This was the first year in which the Prize was awarded to an organization. In the 21st century, Habima employs 80 actors, and another 120 staff members work at the complex.
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Площадь Габима
2 Tarsat Ave
142
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The Habima Theatre (תיאטורון הבימה - Teat'ron HaBima, lit. "The Stage Theatre") is the national theatre of Israel and one of the first Hebrew language theatres. It is located in Habima Square in the center of Tel Aviv Habima was founded by Nahum Zemach in Białystok (then in Grodno Governorate, Russia) in 1912. Menahem Gnessin was one of its cofounders and early actors. Because its performances were in Hebrew and it dealt with issues of the Jewish people, it met with persecution by the Czarist government. Beginning in 1918, it operated under the auspices of the Moscow Art Theatre, which some consider its true beginning. It encountered difficulties under the Soviet government as well after the Russian Revolution. Stanislavski arranged for the mainly Jewish Polish actors to be trained by Yevgeny Vakhtangov. The People's Commissar for Nationalities Affairs, Joseph Stalin, also authorized the theatre's creation. In 1926, the theatre left the Soviet Union to tour abroad, including in the United States. Zemach and some actors stayed in New York City, where their productions had met with success. Their productions included plays from the Jewish folk tradition, and they were performed in Hebrew. The company split up, with some members choosing to stay in New York. Habima has been officially considered the national theatre of Israel since 1958, the year in which it received the Israel Prize for theatre. This was the first year in which the Prize was awarded to an organization. In the 21st century, Habima employs 80 actors, and another 120 staff members work at the complex.
The Cameri Theater (Hebrew: התיאטרון הקאמרי‎, HaTeatron HaKameri), established in 1944 in Tel Aviv, is one of the leading theaters in Israel, and is housed at the Tel Aviv Performing Arts Center. The Cameri, Tel Aviv's municipal theater, stages up to ten new productions a year, in addition to its repertoire from previous years. The theater has 34,000 subscribers and attracts some 900,000 spectators annually. In 2003, the Cameri moved into its new home at the Tel Aviv Performing Arts Center complex, adjacent to the New Israeli Opera, the Municipal Library and the Tel Aviv Museum of Art. The Cameri's social action programs include the Peace Foundation, which brings together young Israelis and Palestinians to watch theater performances, and Theater in Education, which brings high school students, university students and special needs audiences to the theater. The Cameri also offers ticket subsidies for senior citizens and simultaneous translation of its productions into English, Russian and Arabic. The director general of the Cameri, Noam Semel, founded the Institute of Israeli Drama, which promotes Israeli theater in Israel and abroad.
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Cameri Theater
19 Sderot Sha'ul HaMelech
11
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The Cameri Theater (Hebrew: התיאטרון הקאמרי‎, HaTeatron HaKameri), established in 1944 in Tel Aviv, is one of the leading theaters in Israel, and is housed at the Tel Aviv Performing Arts Center. The Cameri, Tel Aviv's municipal theater, stages up to ten new productions a year, in addition to its repertoire from previous years. The theater has 34,000 subscribers and attracts some 900,000 spectators annually. In 2003, the Cameri moved into its new home at the Tel Aviv Performing Arts Center complex, adjacent to the New Israeli Opera, the Municipal Library and the Tel Aviv Museum of Art. The Cameri's social action programs include the Peace Foundation, which brings together young Israelis and Palestinians to watch theater performances, and Theater in Education, which brings high school students, university students and special needs audiences to the theater. The Cameri also offers ticket subsidies for senior citizens and simultaneous translation of its productions into English, Russian and Arabic. The director general of the Cameri, Noam Semel, founded the Institute of Israeli Drama, which promotes Israeli theater in Israel and abroad.
Ben-Gurion House. The Ben-Gurion House was built in 1930-1931, when the first workers' neighborhood was established on Keren Kayemet Le'Israel (The Jewish National Fund) land. Like all other houses built in that neighborhood, it was a one-family house, planned by the late engineer David Tuvia. The price of the house, 350 Palestinian pounds, was paid in installments, by Paula and David Ben-Gurion. The building was enlarged in 1946 and again renovated in 1960. It was Paula and David Ben-Gurion's permanent residence until they settled in Sde-Boker. Later on, they lived alternately here and in their 'tsriff' in Sde-Boker, until Ben-Gurion's death in 1973. "I BEQUEATH TO THE STATE OF ISRAEL MY HOME IN TEL-AVIV…"In his will, David Ben-Gurion bequeathed his house in Tel-Aviv to the state of Israel. Ben-Gurion requested the house to become a public institution for reading, study and research. After his death, the 'Knesset' (Israeli Parliament) unanimously voted for, following the decision of the Government of Israel, the "David Ben-Gurion Law – 1976" - which declared the house as a national site. It was opened to the public on 29.11.1974. All the items belonging to Paula and David Ben-Gurion are in the house, in the same condition and in the same place they used to be when the house was lived in. Souvenirs and exhibits were added when the house was opened to the public.
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Дом Бен-Гуриона
17 שדרות בן גוריון
18
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Ben-Gurion House. The Ben-Gurion House was built in 1930-1931, when the first workers' neighborhood was established on Keren Kayemet Le'Israel (The Jewish National Fund) land. Like all other houses built in that neighborhood, it was a one-family house, planned by the late engineer David Tuvia. The price of the house, 350 Palestinian pounds, was paid in installments, by Paula and David Ben-Gurion. The building was enlarged in 1946 and again renovated in 1960. It was Paula and David Ben-Gurion's permanent residence until they settled in Sde-Boker. Later on, they lived alternately here and in their 'tsriff' in Sde-Boker, until Ben-Gurion's death in 1973. "I BEQUEATH TO THE STATE OF ISRAEL MY HOME IN TEL-AVIV…"In his will, David Ben-Gurion bequeathed his house in Tel-Aviv to the state of Israel. Ben-Gurion requested the house to become a public institution for reading, study and research. After his death, the 'Knesset' (Israeli Parliament) unanimously voted for, following the decision of the Government of Israel, the "David Ben-Gurion Law – 1976" - which declared the house as a national site. It was opened to the public on 29.11.1974. All the items belonging to Paula and David Ben-Gurion are in the house, in the same condition and in the same place they used to be when the house was lived in. Souvenirs and exhibits were added when the house was opened to the public.
Food Scene
Max Brenner Chocolate Bar. Best Chocolate Bar in the World!
Max Brenner
3 התערוכה
Max Brenner Chocolate Bar. Best Chocolate Bar in the World!
Greece Restaurant with good groove
Greco
Greece Restaurant with good groove
Tel Aviv Farmers Market
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Tel Aviv Port Market
12 Nemal Tel Aviv St
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Tel Aviv Farmers Market
Delicious experience at Tel Aviv's Sarona Market. From high-end French chef restaurants to traditional local cuisine, the Sarona Market has it all. A small piece of advice: come to Sarona with a healthy appetite. You won't leave disappointed.
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Рынок Сарона
3 Aluf Kalman Magen St
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Delicious experience at Tel Aviv's Sarona Market. From high-end French chef restaurants to traditional local cuisine, the Sarona Market has it all. A small piece of advice: come to Sarona with a healthy appetite. You won't leave disappointed.
Brasserie M&R 70 Ibn Gvirol St. Tel. (03) 696 7111 Located in the heart of Tel Aviv opposite Rabin Square, this immensely popular French restaurant gives diners the impression they were whisked away to Paris. From its meticulously detailed Art Deco interior to its nicotine stained ceiling and hardwood floors, the Brasserie is a paean to the traditional Parisian grand brasserie. Every detail of the décor is sophisticated but not stuffy. The food is equally refined and meticulously prepared. Open 24 hours a day, Brasserie is one of the only places in Tel Aviv that is hopping both day and night - and despite the clientele that includes an Israeli Who’s Who, it still manages to maintain a neighborhood feel.
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M&R
70 Shlomo Ibn Gabirol St
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Brasserie M&R 70 Ibn Gvirol St. Tel. (03) 696 7111 Located in the heart of Tel Aviv opposite Rabin Square, this immensely popular French restaurant gives diners the impression they were whisked away to Paris. From its meticulously detailed Art Deco interior to its nicotine stained ceiling and hardwood floors, the Brasserie is a paean to the traditional Parisian grand brasserie. Every detail of the décor is sophisticated but not stuffy. The food is equally refined and meticulously prepared. Open 24 hours a day, Brasserie is one of the only places in Tel Aviv that is hopping both day and night - and despite the clientele that includes an Israeli Who’s Who, it still manages to maintain a neighborhood feel.
Eyal Shani has invented gourmet fast food! The menu offers pita with various fillings including minute steak (44 NIS), entrecôte with fried egg (37 NIS), and ratatouille (34 NIS). All the ingredients are fresh and of the highest standard, especially the delicious and soft pita. We also recommend ordering the DIVINE baked cauliflower (32 NIS) to share with whomever you’re with. Whilst you’re waiting for your name to be called, help yourself to the pita slices and delicious tehina and salsa which they leave for customers to nibble on (be careful not to fill up!) When a friend visits from abroad, we always make Miznon a priority- it is a great place to experience the loud and chaotic Israeli atmosphere along with some delicious Israeli-style food.
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Miznon
23 Shlomo Ibn Gabirol St
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Eyal Shani has invented gourmet fast food! The menu offers pita with various fillings including minute steak (44 NIS), entrecôte with fried egg (37 NIS), and ratatouille (34 NIS). All the ingredients are fresh and of the highest standard, especially the delicious and soft pita. We also recommend ordering the DIVINE baked cauliflower (32 NIS) to share with whomever you’re with. Whilst you’re waiting for your name to be called, help yourself to the pita slices and delicious tehina and salsa which they leave for customers to nibble on (be careful not to fill up!) When a friend visits from abroad, we always make Miznon a priority- it is a great place to experience the loud and chaotic Israeli atmosphere along with some delicious Israeli-style food.
Sightseeing
A really Beautiful and highly touristic area with LOTS of shops, restaurants, bars and clubs. During day time you can also do some shopping! Just 4 minutes drive/ 30 m walk/ 10 m with my bike
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Tel Aviv Port
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A really Beautiful and highly touristic area with LOTS of shops, restaurants, bars and clubs. During day time you can also do some shopping! Just 4 minutes drive/ 30 m walk/ 10 m with my bike
Rabin Square is a large public city square in the center of Tel Aviv, Israel. Over the years it has been the site of numerous political rallies, parades, and other public events. In 1995 the square was renamed 'Rabin Square' following the assassination of Yitzhak Rabin which occurred there on November 4 of that year. The square is surrounded by the city hall building to the north (designed by the architect Menachem Cohen), Ibn Gabirol Street to the east, Frischmann Street to the south and Hen Boulevard to the west. It was designed alongside the city hall in 1964 by architects Yaski and Alexandroni.
Rabin Square/Ibn Gvirol
Rabin Square is a large public city square in the center of Tel Aviv, Israel. Over the years it has been the site of numerous political rallies, parades, and other public events. In 1995 the square was renamed 'Rabin Square' following the assassination of Yitzhak Rabin which occurred there on November 4 of that year. The square is surrounded by the city hall building to the north (designed by the architect Menachem Cohen), Ibn Gabirol Street to the east, Frischmann Street to the south and Hen Boulevard to the west. It was designed alongside the city hall in 1964 by architects Yaski and Alexandroni.
is one of the principal streets in the center of Tel Aviv, Israel, beginning in Neve Tzedek at its southwestern edge and running north to Habima Theatre. It is one of the most expensive streets in the city, being one of the city's main tourist attractions. It features a wide, tree-lined central strip with pedestrian and bike lanes. Rothschild Boulevard was initially called Rehov HaAm ("Street of the people"). Later, the residents requested it to be renamed in honor of Baron Edmond James de Rothschild. One house, on the corner of Rothschild Boulevard and Herzl Street, was built in 1909 by the Eliavson family, one of Tel Aviv's sixty founding families. In 2007, the building was purchased and restored by the French Institute. Israel's Declaration of Independence was signed at Independence Hall on Rothschild Boulevard. Many of the historic buildings are built in the Bauhaus or International style, forming part of the White City of Tel Aviv, a UNESCO-designated World Heritage Site. The 1925 Lederberg house, at the intersection of Allenby Street features a series of large ceramic murals designed by Ze'ev Raban a member of the Bezalel school.
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бульвар Ротшильда
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is one of the principal streets in the center of Tel Aviv, Israel, beginning in Neve Tzedek at its southwestern edge and running north to Habima Theatre. It is one of the most expensive streets in the city, being one of the city's main tourist attractions. It features a wide, tree-lined central strip with pedestrian and bike lanes. Rothschild Boulevard was initially called Rehov HaAm ("Street of the people"). Later, the residents requested it to be renamed in honor of Baron Edmond James de Rothschild. One house, on the corner of Rothschild Boulevard and Herzl Street, was built in 1909 by the Eliavson family, one of Tel Aviv's sixty founding families. In 2007, the building was purchased and restored by the French Institute. Israel's Declaration of Independence was signed at Independence Hall on Rothschild Boulevard. Many of the historic buildings are built in the Bauhaus or International style, forming part of the White City of Tel Aviv, a UNESCO-designated World Heritage Site. The 1925 Lederberg house, at the intersection of Allenby Street features a series of large ceramic murals designed by Ze'ev Raban a member of the Bezalel school.
Jaffa Railway Station was the first railway station in the Middle East. It served as the terminus for the Jaffa–Jerusalem railway. The station opened in 1891 and closed in 1948. In 2005–2009, the station was restored and converted into an entertainment and leisure venue marketed as "HaTachana", Hebrew for "the station"
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Cтарый вокзал
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Jaffa Railway Station was the first railway station in the Middle East. It served as the terminus for the Jaffa–Jerusalem railway. The station opened in 1891 and closed in 1948. In 2005–2009, the station was restored and converted into an entertainment and leisure venue marketed as "HaTachana", Hebrew for "the station"
The Jaffa Clock Tower (Hebrew: מגדל השעון יפו‎, Migdal haShaon Yafo, Arabic: يافا برج الساعة‎) is one of seven clock towers built in Palestine during the Ottoman period. The others are located in Safed, Acre, Nazareth, Haifa, Nablus (West Bank) and Jerusalem, the last being the only one that has not survived until today. The Jaffa Clock Tower stands in the middle of Yefet street at the northern entrance of Jaffa, the ancient city that is now a part of the greater Tel Aviv. The tower, which is made of limestone, incorporates two clocks and a plaque commemorating the Israelis killed in the battle for the town in the 1948 Arab–Israeli War. The tower was built to commemorate the silver jubilee of the reign of the Ottoman Sultan Abd al-Hamid II. The tower was built with contributions of the residents of the city, Arabs and Jews, headed by Joseph Bey Moyal. The first stone of the tower was laid in September 1900. Within a year two floors were built and the construction of a third floor had begun. In 1903 the clock tower had been erected. It is similar to the clock tower of Khan al-Umdan in Acre that is dedicated to the same purpose. More than a hundred similar clock towers were built throughout the Ottoman Empire due to this occasion
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Часовая башня
14 Yefet St
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The Jaffa Clock Tower (Hebrew: מגדל השעון יפו‎, Migdal haShaon Yafo, Arabic: يافا برج الساعة‎) is one of seven clock towers built in Palestine during the Ottoman period. The others are located in Safed, Acre, Nazareth, Haifa, Nablus (West Bank) and Jerusalem, the last being the only one that has not survived until today. The Jaffa Clock Tower stands in the middle of Yefet street at the northern entrance of Jaffa, the ancient city that is now a part of the greater Tel Aviv. The tower, which is made of limestone, incorporates two clocks and a plaque commemorating the Israelis killed in the battle for the town in the 1948 Arab–Israeli War. The tower was built to commemorate the silver jubilee of the reign of the Ottoman Sultan Abd al-Hamid II. The tower was built with contributions of the residents of the city, Arabs and Jews, headed by Joseph Bey Moyal. The first stone of the tower was laid in September 1900. Within a year two floors were built and the construction of a third floor had begun. In 1903 the clock tower had been erected. It is similar to the clock tower of Khan al-Umdan in Acre that is dedicated to the same purpose. More than a hundred similar clock towers were built throughout the Ottoman Empire due to this occasion
Jaffa Port (Hebrew: נמל יפו‎, Nemal Yafo) is an ancient port on the Mediterranean Sea, located in the Old City of Jaffa, now Israel. Jaffa and its port have a history spanning over three millennia. The port itself is mentioned in various ancient works, including the Hebrew Bible, such as the book of Jonah, and the works of Josephus describing Jewish history and the First Jewish Revolt against Rome. For over 7,000 years it has been actively used, predating Muslims, Christians, Jews, and even Egyptians. Still functional as a small fishing port, the port is currently a recreational zone featuring restaurants and cafés. A lighthouse, Jaffa Light, is located above the port. In 1917, during World War I, British troops under General Allenby defeated the Ottomans and took Jaffa, which became part of the British-administered Palestine Mandate (1922–1948). In 1947 and 1948 there was sharp fighting between Jaffa, which was largely inhabited by Arabs, and the adjoining Jewish city of Tel Aviv. On 13 May 1948 (a day before the proclamation of the State of Israel), the Arab forces in Jaffa were defeated after long fighting with the Zionist underground Haganah and Irgun Zva'i Leumi forces. On 24 April 1950, the Jewish city of Tel Aviv and the Arab city of Jaffa were unified, and the Tel Aviv-Yafo Municipality was established. Today, Arabs of various denominations constitute about 25,000 inhabitants out of a total of 35,000 people. Jaffa has an old fishing harbor, modern boat docks, and a tourism center. Jaffa is a major tourist attraction with a combination of old, new and restored buildings. Its visitor attractions include art galleries, souvenir shops, restaurants, sidewalk cafes, boardwalks, and shopping. It offers a variety of culture, entertainment and food (fish restaurants). The city is noted for its export of the Jaffa oranges.
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Jaffa Port
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Jaffa Port (Hebrew: נמל יפו‎, Nemal Yafo) is an ancient port on the Mediterranean Sea, located in the Old City of Jaffa, now Israel. Jaffa and its port have a history spanning over three millennia. The port itself is mentioned in various ancient works, including the Hebrew Bible, such as the book of Jonah, and the works of Josephus describing Jewish history and the First Jewish Revolt against Rome. For over 7,000 years it has been actively used, predating Muslims, Christians, Jews, and even Egyptians. Still functional as a small fishing port, the port is currently a recreational zone featuring restaurants and cafés. A lighthouse, Jaffa Light, is located above the port. In 1917, during World War I, British troops under General Allenby defeated the Ottomans and took Jaffa, which became part of the British-administered Palestine Mandate (1922–1948). In 1947 and 1948 there was sharp fighting between Jaffa, which was largely inhabited by Arabs, and the adjoining Jewish city of Tel Aviv. On 13 May 1948 (a day before the proclamation of the State of Israel), the Arab forces in Jaffa were defeated after long fighting with the Zionist underground Haganah and Irgun Zva'i Leumi forces. On 24 April 1950, the Jewish city of Tel Aviv and the Arab city of Jaffa were unified, and the Tel Aviv-Yafo Municipality was established. Today, Arabs of various denominations constitute about 25,000 inhabitants out of a total of 35,000 people. Jaffa has an old fishing harbor, modern boat docks, and a tourism center. Jaffa is a major tourist attraction with a combination of old, new and restored buildings. Its visitor attractions include art galleries, souvenir shops, restaurants, sidewalk cafes, boardwalks, and shopping. It offers a variety of culture, entertainment and food (fish restaurants). The city is noted for its export of the Jaffa oranges.
One of the city's main squares
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Dizengoff Square
87 Dizengoff St
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One of the city's main squares
Nachlat Binyamin arts and crafts fair is the first and biggest of its kind in Israel, and one of the most beautiful market of its kind in the world. The market is original and renews itself with new products made by the artists and by new artists that join the market. All products are hand made and sold by the artists themselves making the visit to the market a very special one. The fair is a very special experience. It is full of very special and unique hand made creations and designs, beautiful buildings, coffee shops and street performances and live music. All these make the fair a must in your itenerary and a great place to buy that special and original gift for the people you love and remember at home. The fair is open twice a week all year round on Tuesdays and Fridays from 10:00 to 18:00 (June) July– August until 19:00 and Tuesdays 10:00 - 17:00 Fridays 10:00 - 16:30 during the winter.
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Nahalat Binyamin Street
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Nachlat Binyamin arts and crafts fair is the first and biggest of its kind in Israel, and one of the most beautiful market of its kind in the world. The market is original and renews itself with new products made by the artists and by new artists that join the market. All products are hand made and sold by the artists themselves making the visit to the market a very special one. The fair is a very special experience. It is full of very special and unique hand made creations and designs, beautiful buildings, coffee shops and street performances and live music. All these make the fair a must in your itenerary and a great place to buy that special and original gift for the people you love and remember at home. The fair is open twice a week all year round on Tuesdays and Fridays from 10:00 to 18:00 (June) July– August until 19:00 and Tuesdays 10:00 - 17:00 Fridays 10:00 - 16:30 during the winter.
Drinks & Nightlife
Irish Bar
Temple Bar
Irish Bar