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Lizbeth's Guidebook

Lizbeth

Lizbeth's Guidebook

Food scene
39
(рекомендации местных жителей)
Roots Cafe
639 5th Avenue
39
(рекомендации местных жителей)
12
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Peppino's Park Slope
469 5th Avenue
12
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441 Seventh Ave., at 15th St.; 347-294-4786 Agern vet Brad Willits quietly opened this restaurant in 2017 to little fanfare — certainly nowhere close to the amount of acclaim you would expect for a spot that’s this consistently excellent. The seasonal menu changes often, though the fried muffins, served hot with house butter on the side, are a constant — order more than one serving — as are the inky-black squid crackers topped with mackerel pâté. For main dishes, the duck and the steak are sure bets. Cocktails are as inventive as they are well-executed, especially the rum-based Long Meadow, with apricot liqueur. And with a burger and other snacks available only at the bar, Camperdown Elm is as easy to pop into for a late-night bite or $1 East Coast oysters during happy hour as for the best multicourse meal in Park Slope.
8
(рекомендации местных жителей)
Camperdown Elm
441 7th Ave
8
(рекомендации местных жителей)
441 Seventh Ave., at 15th St.; 347-294-4786 Agern vet Brad Willits quietly opened this restaurant in 2017 to little fanfare — certainly nowhere close to the amount of acclaim you would expect for a spot that’s this consistently excellent. The seasonal menu changes often, though the fried muffins, served hot with house butter on the side, are a constant — order more than one serving — as are the inky-black squid crackers topped with mackerel pâté. For main dishes, the duck and the steak are sure bets. Cocktails are as inventive as they are well-executed, especially the rum-based Long Meadow, with apricot liqueur. And with a burger and other snacks available only at the bar, Camperdown Elm is as easy to pop into for a late-night bite or $1 East Coast oysters during happy hour as for the best multicourse meal in Park Slope.
While this replacement for much-beloved Franny’s has retained the wood-fired oven, the rest of the space has been updated in sleek, mid-century-modern fashion, with Hoffmann side chairs and beautiful wood paneling, and it’s clear from the moment you walk in that the two L’Artusi alums who’ve launched this venture sweat the details. Such exacting standards paired with the location between Grand Army Plaza and the Barclays Center have made it one of Brooklyn’s most-lauded openings since Olmsted. The food certainly lives up to the buzz, with a braised pork shank so tender that it practically melts in your mouth; and the delicate rice balls with quadrello di bufala cheese are a revelation if you’re used to the heavy red-sauce-joint version. Everything about this restaurant, from the expert bartenders to the attentive service to the well-curated wine list seems to fire on all cylinders, and if you’re willing to spend a little, it’s one of the best dining experiences you can have in any borough
8
(рекомендации местных жителей)
Fausto
348 Flatbush Ave
8
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While this replacement for much-beloved Franny’s has retained the wood-fired oven, the rest of the space has been updated in sleek, mid-century-modern fashion, with Hoffmann side chairs and beautiful wood paneling, and it’s clear from the moment you walk in that the two L’Artusi alums who’ve launched this venture sweat the details. Such exacting standards paired with the location between Grand Army Plaza and the Barclays Center have made it one of Brooklyn’s most-lauded openings since Olmsted. The food certainly lives up to the buzz, with a braised pork shank so tender that it practically melts in your mouth; and the delicate rice balls with quadrello di bufala cheese are a revelation if you’re used to the heavy red-sauce-joint version. Everything about this restaurant, from the expert bartenders to the attentive service to the well-curated wine list seems to fire on all cylinders, and if you’re willing to spend a little, it’s one of the best dining experiences you can have in any borough
Sushi Katsuei towers head and shoulders above any other Japanese restaurant in the Zip Code. The trio of chefs responsible for the nine-course, $52 omakase experience stand like austere Pep Boys behind the counter in the Spartan space. But as the tasting menu unfurls, their soft sides show. Tender is the agedashi tofu in its ethereal broth; how mindfully placed the orange jag of sea urchin or the slice of fatty tuna, sprinkled with yuzu, of the nigiri
16
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Sushi Katsuei
210 7th Avenue
16
(рекомендации местных жителей)
Sushi Katsuei towers head and shoulders above any other Japanese restaurant in the Zip Code. The trio of chefs responsible for the nine-course, $52 omakase experience stand like austere Pep Boys behind the counter in the Spartan space. But as the tasting menu unfurls, their soft sides show. Tender is the agedashi tofu in its ethereal broth; how mindfully placed the orange jag of sea urchin or the slice of fatty tuna, sprinkled with yuzu, of the nigiri
Fonda is perhaps better known by its Chelsea and East Village outposts, but the original Park Slope location still holds its own — and is still reliably busy. The chicken enchiladas suizas are the thing to get here, though the mole enchiladas are a safe way to switch it up. Pair them with the signature rosalita margarita or any of the other versions (the spicy chipotle-infused blood-orange margarita doesn’t come to play). It’s also a great date spot: lively, not too fussy, and thoroughly dependable.
66
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Fonda
434 7th Avenue
66
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Fonda is perhaps better known by its Chelsea and East Village outposts, but the original Park Slope location still holds its own — and is still reliably busy. The chicken enchiladas suizas are the thing to get here, though the mole enchiladas are a safe way to switch it up. Pair them with the signature rosalita margarita or any of the other versions (the spicy chipotle-infused blood-orange margarita doesn’t come to play). It’s also a great date spot: lively, not too fussy, and thoroughly dependable.
You would be forgiven for assuming that this place, which advertises its au courant list of natural and biodynamic wines, is too annoying to be worth the trouble. The food, though, makes it worth the stop, even if you blissfully have no opinions on the natural-wine movement (plus, the knowledgeable waitstaff is totally happy to bring out multiple bottles for you to try if you’re in this category). The endive salad contains fresh fruit to balance out the bitterness of the leaves, and the pillowy gnocchi is a simple dish that’s easy to share. The real star of the mains, though, is the formidable grilled octopus tentacle, which you’ll covet if you don’t order.
Terre
341 5th Ave
You would be forgiven for assuming that this place, which advertises its au courant list of natural and biodynamic wines, is too annoying to be worth the trouble. The food, though, makes it worth the stop, even if you blissfully have no opinions on the natural-wine movement (plus, the knowledgeable waitstaff is totally happy to bring out multiple bottles for you to try if you’re in this category). The endive salad contains fresh fruit to balance out the bitterness of the leaves, and the pillowy gnocchi is a simple dish that’s easy to share. The real star of the mains, though, is the formidable grilled octopus tentacle, which you’ll covet if you don’t order.
This North Slope favorite serves the best of Israeli cuisine and is the rare standout in an area that’s full of good, but not great, brunch spots. The Mediterranean crispy dough and the burekas are favorites, though really the only way to go wrong is not getting an order of labneh to share, and regardless of whether your dish comes with it, ask for a side of the spicy harissa.
58
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Miriam
79 5th Ave
58
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This North Slope favorite serves the best of Israeli cuisine and is the rare standout in an area that’s full of good, but not great, brunch spots. The Mediterranean crispy dough and the burekas are favorites, though really the only way to go wrong is not getting an order of labneh to share, and regardless of whether your dish comes with it, ask for a side of the spicy harissa.
At this unassuming Ethiopian restaurant on the Gowanus border, start with sambusas and then get one of the combination platters, served on a bed of injera bread — and bring friends because the bigger the party, the more things you can try. Among the meat dishes, the doro aletcha, seasoned chicken served in an onion sauce, is a crowd-pleaser, but the vegetable dishes (the mushrooms cooked in a berbere sauce and carrots, especially) often outshine the meat dishes, making this one of the better vegan- and vegetarian-friendly spots in the neighborhood. Pair your meal with Ethiopian beer.
19
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Ghenet
348 Douglass Street
19
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At this unassuming Ethiopian restaurant on the Gowanus border, start with sambusas and then get one of the combination platters, served on a bed of injera bread — and bring friends because the bigger the party, the more things you can try. Among the meat dishes, the doro aletcha, seasoned chicken served in an onion sauce, is a crowd-pleaser, but the vegetable dishes (the mushrooms cooked in a berbere sauce and carrots, especially) often outshine the meat dishes, making this one of the better vegan- and vegetarian-friendly spots in the neighborhood. Pair your meal with Ethiopian beer.
There’s no reason an upscale cocktail bar should serve food this good, but somehow Blueprint makes it look effortless. While it’s better known for its superb drinks (like the spicy Smoky Mary’s or the My Dear Julius), you’ll be hard-pressed to avoid ordering a little something once you see the charcuterie plates (which are sliced to order behind the bar) or the baby octopus being sent out. And at around $12 a cocktail, Blueprint avoids the dizzyingly high prices that have become standard fare at many places throughout the city. Lucey’s Lounge in Gowanus serves standout cocktails and is a close substitute for folks in South Slope who are looking for something a little closer to home.
37
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Blueprint
196 5th Avenue
37
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There’s no reason an upscale cocktail bar should serve food this good, but somehow Blueprint makes it look effortless. While it’s better known for its superb drinks (like the spicy Smoky Mary’s or the My Dear Julius), you’ll be hard-pressed to avoid ordering a little something once you see the charcuterie plates (which are sliced to order behind the bar) or the baby octopus being sent out. And at around $12 a cocktail, Blueprint avoids the dizzyingly high prices that have become standard fare at many places throughout the city. Lucey’s Lounge in Gowanus serves standout cocktails and is a close substitute for folks in South Slope who are looking for something a little closer to home.
Yes, this restaurant is occasionally knocked for its lack of authenticity and its overly promiscuous Pan-Latin menu, but you’d be hard-pressed to find another place that serves this caliber of food consistently, affordably, and hospitably. Always start with the platanos con queso or an empanada platter. But between the starters and the addictive plantain chips that come out gratis, you’ll have to be careful about having too much before your mains arrive. The arroz con pollo, paella, fish tacos, skirt steak, and bandeja paisa (probably best split between two people) consistently hit the spot, and the frozen margaritas are top-notch (at $45 for about six servings, the pitcher is the better deal for a group). If you just want à la carte tacos or something a little less heavy, try Bogota’s popular sister restaurant, Miti Miti, across the street
48
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Bogota Latin Bistro
141 5th Avenue
48
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Yes, this restaurant is occasionally knocked for its lack of authenticity and its overly promiscuous Pan-Latin menu, but you’d be hard-pressed to find another place that serves this caliber of food consistently, affordably, and hospitably. Always start with the platanos con queso or an empanada platter. But between the starters and the addictive plantain chips that come out gratis, you’ll have to be careful about having too much before your mains arrive. The arroz con pollo, paella, fish tacos, skirt steak, and bandeja paisa (probably best split between two people) consistently hit the spot, and the frozen margaritas are top-notch (at $45 for about six servings, the pitcher is the better deal for a group). If you just want à la carte tacos or something a little less heavy, try Bogota’s popular sister restaurant, Miti Miti, across the street
Despite a number of pretenders to the crown, the Dram Shop still serves the best bar burger in the neighborhood. Co-owner Clay Mallow traces the recipe — two square griddle-browned patties topped with two slices of American cheese, fresh pickles, lettuce, tomato, onion, mayo, and mustard, sandwiched between a sesame-seed bun — back to what his grandfather served at Mallow Grocery in South Dallas some six decades ago. Go on Tuesday nights, when the $14 burger is half-priced.
28
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Dram Shop
339 9th Street
28
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Despite a number of pretenders to the crown, the Dram Shop still serves the best bar burger in the neighborhood. Co-owner Clay Mallow traces the recipe — two square griddle-browned patties topped with two slices of American cheese, fresh pickles, lettuce, tomato, onion, mayo, and mustard, sandwiched between a sesame-seed bun — back to what his grandfather served at Mallow Grocery in South Dallas some six decades ago. Go on Tuesday nights, when the $14 burger is half-priced.
Where you slot Bonnie’s on this list will be entirely contingent on how you feel about chicken wings, but people who love wings love Bonnie’s.
19
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Bonnie's Grill
278 5th Avenue
19
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Where you slot Bonnie’s on this list will be entirely contingent on how you feel about chicken wings, but people who love wings love Bonnie’s.
A friend who grew up in the area once said she could never quite figure out whether al di là was a great restaurant 15 years ago or whether it was still great according to the standards of 15 years ago. Regardless, this Park Slope mainstay, though beloved, doesn’t quite earn its estimable 90-minute wait times. The highlights here include the shaved-zucchini salad, topped with flakes of Pecorino and chile pepper, and the Swiss chard-and-ricotta malfatti. And it’s often easier to find a spot at the around-the-corner wine bar, which shares a kitchen with the main dining room.
129
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al di la Trattoria
248 5th Avenue
129
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A friend who grew up in the area once said she could never quite figure out whether al di là was a great restaurant 15 years ago or whether it was still great according to the standards of 15 years ago. Regardless, this Park Slope mainstay, though beloved, doesn’t quite earn its estimable 90-minute wait times. The highlights here include the shaved-zucchini salad, topped with flakes of Pecorino and chile pepper, and the Swiss chard-and-ricotta malfatti. And it’s often easier to find a spot at the around-the-corner wine bar, which shares a kitchen with the main dining room.
The café's spirited menu is described by some as “contemporary” American, but the intensely rich flavors are garnered through the use of old-school ingredients. From appetizers to desserts, the kitchen sends out food that may not be flashy, but sure is delicious. A lively staff, a wine list with genuine bargains and creative, fairly priced cocktails round out this first-rate neighborhood dining experience.
52
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Stone Park Cafe
324 5th Avenue
52
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The café's spirited menu is described by some as “contemporary” American, but the intensely rich flavors are garnered through the use of old-school ingredients. From appetizers to desserts, the kitchen sends out food that may not be flashy, but sure is delicious. A lively staff, a wine list with genuine bargains and creative, fairly priced cocktails round out this first-rate neighborhood dining experience.
The use of organic, sustainably raised ingredients from local producers is why Rose Water earned a loyal following of locals who settle in the muted, earth-toned room to peruse a menu that changes frequently but is reliably stacked with bold flavors. Main courses may include grilled striped bass with fiddleheads, bacon, shiitake mushrooms and almond milk or tender braised beef short ribs with braised red cabbage, mustard spaetzle and horseradish-dill cream.
43
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Rose Water - Classic
787 Union Street
43
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The use of organic, sustainably raised ingredients from local producers is why Rose Water earned a loyal following of locals who settle in the muted, earth-toned room to peruse a menu that changes frequently but is reliably stacked with bold flavors. Main courses may include grilled striped bass with fiddleheads, bacon, shiitake mushrooms and almond milk or tender braised beef short ribs with braised red cabbage, mustard spaetzle and horseradish-dill cream.
This Mediterranean restaurant in Park Slope draws inspiration from Turkish cuisine and fresh ingredients. You can also opt for the chef’s selection of mezes, or cold vegetarian appetizers in the narrow, minimalist space
Seed
242 5th Ave
This Mediterranean restaurant in Park Slope draws inspiration from Turkish cuisine and fresh ingredients. You can also opt for the chef’s selection of mezes, or cold vegetarian appetizers in the narrow, minimalist space
With the success of the Soho original, the French-trained brothers Bromberg opened this night owl draw in Brooklyn, offering up a clever mix of down-home cooking and haute cuisine, all available into the wee hours of the morning.
27
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Blue Ribbon
280 5th Avenue
27
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With the success of the Soho original, the French-trained brothers Bromberg opened this night owl draw in Brooklyn, offering up a clever mix of down-home cooking and haute cuisine, all available into the wee hours of the morning.
14
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Naruto Ramen
276 5th Avenue
14
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This bustling family-run Italian joint with a pleasantly suburban vibe started in Bay Ridge circa the ‘50s, and like its South Brooklyn original, the Park Slope location is rife with pizzas offered on a range of crusts, including a grandma pizza and the thinner Neopalitan margarita. The cheese game is particularly strong, with burrata, smoked mozzarella, and locally-made fresh mozzarella on offer. A wide range of classic pastas, calzones, and old-school salads and apps are available too; sharing family style is the way to go, and for an area ridden with strollers, it’s a particularly kid-friendly place.
17
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La Villa Pizzeria
261 5th Avenue
17
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This bustling family-run Italian joint with a pleasantly suburban vibe started in Bay Ridge circa the ‘50s, and like its South Brooklyn original, the Park Slope location is rife with pizzas offered on a range of crusts, including a grandma pizza and the thinner Neopalitan margarita. The cheese game is particularly strong, with burrata, smoked mozzarella, and locally-made fresh mozzarella on offer. A wide range of classic pastas, calzones, and old-school salads and apps are available too; sharing family style is the way to go, and for an area ridden with strollers, it’s a particularly kid-friendly place.
This bakery is helmed by married couple T.J. Obias and Vera Tong Obias, who’ve collectively done stints at the likes of Cafe Gray, Gordon Ramsay at The London, The Russian Tea Room, and Dovetail. It offers French pastries and breads, plus a tasty and affordable breakfast, lunch, and brunch menus, with a small edit of sandwiches, salads, and egg dishes. Cocktails and wines are available as well. The space works for laptop-toting types working remotely, and in warmer weather, there’s a patio space out back, too.
11
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Du Jour Bakery
365 5th Avenue
11
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This bakery is helmed by married couple T.J. Obias and Vera Tong Obias, who’ve collectively done stints at the likes of Cafe Gray, Gordon Ramsay at The London, The Russian Tea Room, and Dovetail. It offers French pastries and breads, plus a tasty and affordable breakfast, lunch, and brunch menus, with a small edit of sandwiches, salads, and egg dishes. Cocktails and wines are available as well. The space works for laptop-toting types working remotely, and in warmer weather, there’s a patio space out back, too.
Pop by for dumplings, baos, and a noodle soups at this casual cash-only takeout joint that also has a Sunnyside outpost. The dumplings, served fried or boiled, are quite dense and doughy, but the filling-to-wrapper ratio is hearty, with fillings like cilantro-charged chicken and shrimp or five spice-packed pork and chives. Toss in an order of hot oil wontons and peanut-laced sesame noodles, topped with piles of julienned veggies, or the Peking duck bao, which is only available on weekends. There’s one communal table and a handful of counter seats for dining in.
9
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Dumplings & Things
5th Avenue
9
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Pop by for dumplings, baos, and a noodle soups at this casual cash-only takeout joint that also has a Sunnyside outpost. The dumplings, served fried or boiled, are quite dense and doughy, but the filling-to-wrapper ratio is hearty, with fillings like cilantro-charged chicken and shrimp or five spice-packed pork and chives. Toss in an order of hot oil wontons and peanut-laced sesame noodles, topped with piles of julienned veggies, or the Peking duck bao, which is only available on weekends. There’s one communal table and a handful of counter seats for dining in.
The main attraction at this Eastern European restaurant in South Slope is the deep fried original burger: a juicy patty plus funky Allgauer Emmentaller cheese, mustard, and a seasonal pickled veggie gets swaddled in dough. The whole thing is dunked in the fryer, accompanied by steak-cut fries or salad. (Dip into sweet beet ketchup, too.) The burger is certainly a filling solo act, but for a gut-busting experience, add on a half order of Halusky, hand-cut potato noodles with Bryndza cheese and bacon morsels. The whole menu goes heavy on meat and potato variations, like Hungarian beef goulash, apple-raisin latkes, and turnip and squash-stuffed pierogis. It also offers an extensive range of ciders and beers.
33
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Korzo
667 5th Ave
33
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The main attraction at this Eastern European restaurant in South Slope is the deep fried original burger: a juicy patty plus funky Allgauer Emmentaller cheese, mustard, and a seasonal pickled veggie gets swaddled in dough. The whole thing is dunked in the fryer, accompanied by steak-cut fries or salad. (Dip into sweet beet ketchup, too.) The burger is certainly a filling solo act, but for a gut-busting experience, add on a half order of Halusky, hand-cut potato noodles with Bryndza cheese and bacon morsels. The whole menu goes heavy on meat and potato variations, like Hungarian beef goulash, apple-raisin latkes, and turnip and squash-stuffed pierogis. It also offers an extensive range of ciders and beers.
This South Slope restaurant is plenty charming for a date but low-key enough to be a casual weeknight dinner that doesn’t require a reservation. Don’t miss the namesake burger, where a thick, juicy Creekstone Farms patty with considerable funk is smothered in a thick layer of white cheddar and served with pickled onions and thin-sliced pickles. It’s accompanied by three hefty duck fat fries.
24
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Lot 2
687 6th Avenue
24
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This South Slope restaurant is plenty charming for a date but low-key enough to be a casual weeknight dinner that doesn’t require a reservation. Don’t miss the namesake burger, where a thick, juicy Creekstone Farms patty with considerable funk is smothered in a thick layer of white cheddar and served with pickled onions and thin-sliced pickles. It’s accompanied by three hefty duck fat fries.
88
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Buttermilk Channel
524 Court Street
88
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South Slope Eatery
486 5th Avenue
South Slope Ramen
651 5th Ave
Gnarly Eats
447 7th Ave
Sips' N Bites
364 Prospect Ave
212 Burgers
252 Prospect Park West
Empanada Loca
606 5th Ave
12
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Fatty Daddy Taco
310 9th Street
12
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24
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Hanco's
350 7th Avenue
24
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6
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Chela
408 5th Ave
6
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6
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Little Purity
390 7th Avenue
6
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7
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El Tenampa Deli and Grocery
706 4th Avenue
7
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Prospect Provisions
597 A 4th Ave
My Cuban Spot
488 Carroll St
Cafe Martin
355 5th Ave
19
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J’eatjet? bar
685 5th Avenue
19
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Colombia in Park Slope
376 5th Avenue
35
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Sea Witch
703 5th Avenue
35
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Home Vietnamese Sandwich
349 5th Ave
Princess
535 5th Ave
12
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Couleur Café
435 7th Avenue
12
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9
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Tin Cup Cafe
719 4th Avenue
9
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33
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Cafe Regular
318 11th Street
33
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32
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Colson Patisserie
374 9th Street
32
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Sightseeing
The Statue of Liberty was France's gift to America. Built in 1886, it remains a famous world symbol of freedom and one of the greatest American icons. It is one of the world's largest statues, standing just under 152 feet tall from the base to the torch, and weighing approximately 450,000 pounds. You can see the statue from land, with particularly good views from Battery Park, on the southern tip of Manhattan. However, to truly appreciate the Statue of Liberty, the best thing to do is to take a short boat trip to Liberty Island and see it up close. You can walk around the base, enter the pedestal, or, with advance reservations, go right up to the crown. On a tour to the Statue of Liberty, you have the option to stop at Ellis Island and explore the Immigration Museum. This fantastic museum is located in the historic immigration station complex, where thousands of immigrants were processed before entering the United States. Displays focus on the process, the experiences, and the stories of the people who came through here on their journey to the United States. You can even search the on-site computer database to see a record of immigrants who came through here.
293
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Государственный заповедник Стейтью оф Либерти
293
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The Statue of Liberty was France's gift to America. Built in 1886, it remains a famous world symbol of freedom and one of the greatest American icons. It is one of the world's largest statues, standing just under 152 feet tall from the base to the torch, and weighing approximately 450,000 pounds. You can see the statue from land, with particularly good views from Battery Park, on the southern tip of Manhattan. However, to truly appreciate the Statue of Liberty, the best thing to do is to take a short boat trip to Liberty Island and see it up close. You can walk around the base, enter the pedestal, or, with advance reservations, go right up to the crown. On a tour to the Statue of Liberty, you have the option to stop at Ellis Island and explore the Immigration Museum. This fantastic museum is located in the historic immigration station complex, where thousands of immigrants were processed before entering the United States. Displays focus on the process, the experiences, and the stories of the people who came through here on their journey to the United States. You can even search the on-site computer database to see a record of immigrants who came through here.
A walk, peddle, or carriage ride through the crisscrossing pathways of Central Park is a must-do on anyone's New York City itinerary. In winter, you can even lace up your skates and glide across Wollman Rink. This huge park in the city center, a half-mile wide and 2.5 miles long, is one of the things that makes New York such a beautiful and livable city. Besides being a great place to experience a little nature, Central Park has many attractions within its borders, and most of them are free, making it one of the few cheap things to do in NYC. Some of the most popular places to visit include the Belvedere Castle, Strawberry Fields, the Central Park Zoo, and the Lake. If you are exploring the park on your own, start by picking up a map at one of the visitor centers and plot your routing.
1161
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Центральный парк
1161
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A walk, peddle, or carriage ride through the crisscrossing pathways of Central Park is a must-do on anyone's New York City itinerary. In winter, you can even lace up your skates and glide across Wollman Rink. This huge park in the city center, a half-mile wide and 2.5 miles long, is one of the things that makes New York such a beautiful and livable city. Besides being a great place to experience a little nature, Central Park has many attractions within its borders, and most of them are free, making it one of the few cheap things to do in NYC. Some of the most popular places to visit include the Belvedere Castle, Strawberry Fields, the Central Park Zoo, and the Lake. If you are exploring the park on your own, start by picking up a map at one of the visitor centers and plot your routing.
When it comes to New York attractions, Rockefeller Center is on almost all tourist's itineraries. This vast entertainment and shopping complex in the middle of Manhattan is home to NBC-TV and other media, but the centerpiece is the 70-story 30 Rockefeller Plaza, an Art Deco skyscraper that offers awesome views over Manhattan from the famous Top of the Rock Observation Deck. The "deck," as it's known, includes three floors, located on the 67th, 69th, and 70th floors. Indoor and outdoor viewing spaces offer spectacular views by day or night. You can buy a Top of the Rock Observation Deck Ticket in advance. These tickets come with a flexible voucher redemption policy, so you can change the date if your plans change or the weather doesn't cooperate. Skating on the outdoor skating rink at the base of the tower is one of the most popular things to do in winter in New York City and a fun activity for families and couples. The rink is typically open from October to April. After Thanksgiving, a huge Christmas tree is erected in front of the skating rink, lighting up the complex for the holiday season. Many people visit New York in December just to see this site. Another point of interest in this area is the famous bronze sculpture of Atlas in front of the International Building. It's a popular subject for photographers.
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Rockefeller Center
45 Rockefeller Plaza
152
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When it comes to New York attractions, Rockefeller Center is on almost all tourist's itineraries. This vast entertainment and shopping complex in the middle of Manhattan is home to NBC-TV and other media, but the centerpiece is the 70-story 30 Rockefeller Plaza, an Art Deco skyscraper that offers awesome views over Manhattan from the famous Top of the Rock Observation Deck. The "deck," as it's known, includes three floors, located on the 67th, 69th, and 70th floors. Indoor and outdoor viewing spaces offer spectacular views by day or night. You can buy a Top of the Rock Observation Deck Ticket in advance. These tickets come with a flexible voucher redemption policy, so you can change the date if your plans change or the weather doesn't cooperate. Skating on the outdoor skating rink at the base of the tower is one of the most popular things to do in winter in New York City and a fun activity for families and couples. The rink is typically open from October to April. After Thanksgiving, a huge Christmas tree is erected in front of the skating rink, lighting up the complex for the holiday season. Many people visit New York in December just to see this site. Another point of interest in this area is the famous bronze sculpture of Atlas in front of the International Building. It's a popular subject for photographers.
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, or the Met, as it is commonly known, was founded in 1870, and is one of the most famous museums in the United States. The permanent collection of The Met contains more than two million works of art, spanning a period of 5,000 years. Although the museum has three sites, the centerpiece is The Met Fifth Avenue. Highlights of the collection include American decorative arts, arms and armor, costumes, Egyptian art, musical instruments, photographs, and much more. Exhibitions bring some of the world's most famous works to the public. If you are serious about your visit to the Met, consider a VIP: Empty Met Tour at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and see this incredible museum with just 25 people before it opens to the general public in the morning. The Met Cloisters, located in Fort Tryon Park in northern Manhattan, is another extremely popular New York museum. This branch of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, housed in an outstanding structure, built around medieval cloisters, chapels, and halls, focuses on the medieval art and architecture of Europe. Address: 1000 5th Avenue, New York, New York
957
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Метрополитен-музей
1000 5th Ave
957
(рекомендации местных жителей)
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, or the Met, as it is commonly known, was founded in 1870, and is one of the most famous museums in the United States. The permanent collection of The Met contains more than two million works of art, spanning a period of 5,000 years. Although the museum has three sites, the centerpiece is The Met Fifth Avenue. Highlights of the collection include American decorative arts, arms and armor, costumes, Egyptian art, musical instruments, photographs, and much more. Exhibitions bring some of the world's most famous works to the public. If you are serious about your visit to the Met, consider a VIP: Empty Met Tour at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and see this incredible museum with just 25 people before it opens to the general public in the morning. The Met Cloisters, located in Fort Tryon Park in northern Manhattan, is another extremely popular New York museum. This branch of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, housed in an outstanding structure, built around medieval cloisters, chapels, and halls, focuses on the medieval art and architecture of Europe. Address: 1000 5th Avenue, New York, New York
Attending a Broadway show is one of the top things to do in New York City. Considered the pinnacle of American theater, this is the place to see the latest shows and the long-running classics. Broadway usually refers simply to Broadway theater, which encompasses a large number of theater venues in the Theater District and along the street of Broadway. For the most popular shows, tickets should be purchased well in advance. Shubert Alley is a famous pedestrian-only alley in the Theater District and home to two well-known playhouses: the Shubert on 221 West 44th Street and the Booth at 22 West 45th Street. Historically, aspiring actors would frequent Shubert Alley looking for opportunities to perform in a play sponsored by theater baron, Sam S. Shubert. A Chorus Line played at The Shubert for a record 6,137 shows. The musical Oklahoma debuted in 1941 at the St. James playhouse just down the street. Other legendary places include Sardi's restaurant, where many famous actors met, and the Music Box Theater, where Irving Berlin staged The Music Box Revue in 1921.
321
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Theater District
321
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Attending a Broadway show is one of the top things to do in New York City. Considered the pinnacle of American theater, this is the place to see the latest shows and the long-running classics. Broadway usually refers simply to Broadway theater, which encompasses a large number of theater venues in the Theater District and along the street of Broadway. For the most popular shows, tickets should be purchased well in advance. Shubert Alley is a famous pedestrian-only alley in the Theater District and home to two well-known playhouses: the Shubert on 221 West 44th Street and the Booth at 22 West 45th Street. Historically, aspiring actors would frequent Shubert Alley looking for opportunities to perform in a play sponsored by theater baron, Sam S. Shubert. A Chorus Line played at The Shubert for a record 6,137 shows. The musical Oklahoma debuted in 1941 at the St. James playhouse just down the street. Other legendary places include Sardi's restaurant, where many famous actors met, and the Music Box Theater, where Irving Berlin staged The Music Box Revue in 1921.
The Empire State Building is one of New York's most famous landmark buildings and key tourist attractions. The 381-meter-tall, 102-storey building was the tallest in the world until the 1 World Trade Center tower rose higher, 41 years later. Topped with a mooring mast for airships, the Empire State Building immediately became a landmark and a symbol for NYC when it opened in 1931. There are actually two observatories atop the Empire State Building, but both offer astounding views. On clear days, you can see up to 80 miles, looking into the neighboring states of New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, and Massachusetts. The 86th Floor Observatory (1,050 feet) is the city's highest open-air observation deck, and what most people are expecting to find when they go up the Empire State Building. If it feels familiar, it's because this area has been featured in countless movies and TV shows. Reached by high-speed, automatic elevators, it has both a glass-enclosed area, which is heated in winter and cooled in summer, and spacious outdoor promenades on all four sides of the building. Views are incredible. The Top Deck on the 102nd Floor stands 1,250 feet above the bustling streets below. While you are 16 storeys higher, the viewing area here is enclosed. The line to go up the Empire State Building is almost always long, and during peak times, it can be ridiculous, making the whole experience more frustrating than it needs to be. It's well worth buying the Empire State Building Ticket - Observatory and Optional Skip the Line Ticket that lets you bypass the lines. This is a flexible ticket, good for up to a year, so if the weather is bad, you can save the ticket and use it another day.
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Эмпайр-стейт-билдинг
20 W 34th St
52
(рекомендации местных жителей)
The Empire State Building is one of New York's most famous landmark buildings and key tourist attractions. The 381-meter-tall, 102-storey building was the tallest in the world until the 1 World Trade Center tower rose higher, 41 years later. Topped with a mooring mast for airships, the Empire State Building immediately became a landmark and a symbol for NYC when it opened in 1931. There are actually two observatories atop the Empire State Building, but both offer astounding views. On clear days, you can see up to 80 miles, looking into the neighboring states of New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, and Massachusetts. The 86th Floor Observatory (1,050 feet) is the city's highest open-air observation deck, and what most people are expecting to find when they go up the Empire State Building. If it feels familiar, it's because this area has been featured in countless movies and TV shows. Reached by high-speed, automatic elevators, it has both a glass-enclosed area, which is heated in winter and cooled in summer, and spacious outdoor promenades on all four sides of the building. Views are incredible. The Top Deck on the 102nd Floor stands 1,250 feet above the bustling streets below. While you are 16 storeys higher, the viewing area here is enclosed. The line to go up the Empire State Building is almost always long, and during peak times, it can be ridiculous, making the whole experience more frustrating than it needs to be. It's well worth buying the Empire State Building Ticket - Observatory and Optional Skip the Line Ticket that lets you bypass the lines. This is a flexible ticket, good for up to a year, so if the weather is bad, you can save the ticket and use it another day.
The World Trade Center's twin 110-story towers once dominated the Manhattan skyline but were destroyed by suicide-piloted jetliners on September 11, 2001, with a tragic loss of life. Where the two towers of the World Trade Center once stood, now stand two square reflecting pools, each one acre in size. Known as the National September 11 Memorial, the area is a moving tribute to the almost 3,000 people killed as a result of attacks on September 11, 2001 and also the six people killed in the earlier World Trade Center bombing in February, 1993. Surrounded by trees and grass, the pools are recessed, with water cascading over the sides and flowing into a seemingly bottomless square. These are the largest manmade waterfalls in North America. Around the pools are bronze panels with the names of all those who were killed in the attacks. The 9/11 Memorial Museum is located in an awesome, curving glass building, between the two pools. It features displays that include artifacts, photos, and videos, presenting the story of 9/11, as well as the aftermath and impacts. The building is constructed around the remnants of the World Trade Center and incorporates the old structures within the extraordinary new museum building. The memorial and the museum are located on the south side of One World Trade Centre, on Greenwich Street. Also worth seeing in this area, on the opposite side of Greenwich Street, is the eye-catching Westfield World Trade Center, which contains Oculus Plaza. You can't miss this building with its white fins and spaceship-like appearance. This is a public building with shops and high-end stores, but it's worth popping in for a quick look at the architecture.
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9 / 11 Мемориал
180 Greenwich St
165
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The World Trade Center's twin 110-story towers once dominated the Manhattan skyline but were destroyed by suicide-piloted jetliners on September 11, 2001, with a tragic loss of life. Where the two towers of the World Trade Center once stood, now stand two square reflecting pools, each one acre in size. Known as the National September 11 Memorial, the area is a moving tribute to the almost 3,000 people killed as a result of attacks on September 11, 2001 and also the six people killed in the earlier World Trade Center bombing in February, 1993. Surrounded by trees and grass, the pools are recessed, with water cascading over the sides and flowing into a seemingly bottomless square. These are the largest manmade waterfalls in North America. Around the pools are bronze panels with the names of all those who were killed in the attacks. The 9/11 Memorial Museum is located in an awesome, curving glass building, between the two pools. It features displays that include artifacts, photos, and videos, presenting the story of 9/11, as well as the aftermath and impacts. The building is constructed around the remnants of the World Trade Center and incorporates the old structures within the extraordinary new museum building. The memorial and the museum are located on the south side of One World Trade Centre, on Greenwich Street. Also worth seeing in this area, on the opposite side of Greenwich Street, is the eye-catching Westfield World Trade Center, which contains Oculus Plaza. You can't miss this building with its white fins and spaceship-like appearance. This is a public building with shops and high-end stores, but it's worth popping in for a quick look at the architecture.
An exciting new attraction in New York City, the High Line is a former rail line that has been transformed into an urban walking trail above the city streets. This unique linear public park has been planted with a variety of plants and trees, many of which are native species. In spring many of these come into bloom. The park is lined with glass railings in most areas, giving it a natural feel, while still offering outstanding views of the city. This oasis on Manhattan's West Side runs from Gansevoort Street at the south end (just south of West 13th Street) to West 34th Street at the north end, running parallel to 10th Ave most of the way. You can access it at various points along the route, some of which offer stair access only, and others with elevator access. Although the High Line is only about two to three stories above street level, the views of the city's architecture and the lookouts over the streets offer a whole new perspective. Along the route are art installations, benches, and near the south end is a sitting area with bleacher-style seating and a glass wall looking out onto the city. The trail is heavily used, and on weekends it can be extremely busy, but without the surrounding traffic, it's still a peaceful retreat. You'll find other interesting places to visit just off the High Line. The south section runs through the Meatpacking District, with plenty of trendy restaurants and fine dining. The southernmost access point is adjacent to the Whitney Museum of American Art, which is also worth a visit. If you hop off the High Line at the 16th Street access (elevator access), it's just a short stroll to the popular Chelsea Market, located in a former Nabisco factory, where you'll find restaurants and unique shops.
1108
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Хай Лайн
1108
(рекомендации местных жителей)
An exciting new attraction in New York City, the High Line is a former rail line that has been transformed into an urban walking trail above the city streets. This unique linear public park has been planted with a variety of plants and trees, many of which are native species. In spring many of these come into bloom. The park is lined with glass railings in most areas, giving it a natural feel, while still offering outstanding views of the city. This oasis on Manhattan's West Side runs from Gansevoort Street at the south end (just south of West 13th Street) to West 34th Street at the north end, running parallel to 10th Ave most of the way. You can access it at various points along the route, some of which offer stair access only, and others with elevator access. Although the High Line is only about two to three stories above street level, the views of the city's architecture and the lookouts over the streets offer a whole new perspective. Along the route are art installations, benches, and near the south end is a sitting area with bleacher-style seating and a glass wall looking out onto the city. The trail is heavily used, and on weekends it can be extremely busy, but without the surrounding traffic, it's still a peaceful retreat. You'll find other interesting places to visit just off the High Line. The south section runs through the Meatpacking District, with plenty of trendy restaurants and fine dining. The southernmost access point is adjacent to the Whitney Museum of American Art, which is also worth a visit. If you hop off the High Line at the 16th Street access (elevator access), it's just a short stroll to the popular Chelsea Market, located in a former Nabisco factory, where you'll find restaurants and unique shops.
Lined with huge, brilliantly lit billboards and screens, Times Square is the place to go in New York in the evening, but still exciting at any time of day. This is the location of New York's New Year's Eve Celebrations and the famous "ball drop" at midnight, when the square and surrounding streets are filled with people. Times Square is busy and perpetually crowded but has its own unique appeal. Bleachers set up at one end are a great place to take a break and appreciate the scene. Formerly Longacre Square, Times Square was named in 1904 after the New York Times tower. The newspaper first posted current headlines along its moving sign, the first of its kind in the world, in 1928. Address: Broadway and 7th Avenue, New York, New York
510
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Таймс сквер
510
(рекомендации местных жителей)
Lined with huge, brilliantly lit billboards and screens, Times Square is the place to go in New York in the evening, but still exciting at any time of day. This is the location of New York's New Year's Eve Celebrations and the famous "ball drop" at midnight, when the square and surrounding streets are filled with people. Times Square is busy and perpetually crowded but has its own unique appeal. Bleachers set up at one end are a great place to take a break and appreciate the scene. Formerly Longacre Square, Times Square was named in 1904 after the New York Times tower. The newspaper first posted current headlines along its moving sign, the first of its kind in the world, in 1928. Address: Broadway and 7th Avenue, New York, New York
The Brooklyn Bridge, with its Gothic-shaped arches and suspension cables, is one of the city's most recognizable landmarks and has inspired generations of poets, songwriters, and painters. This historic bridge, spanning the East River from Manhattan to Brooklyn, was completed in 1883 and was the world's first steel suspension bridge. You can see it from many of the ferries, or the east side of Manhattan, but the best way to experience this icon is to take an hour and walk across the Brooklyn Bridge. A wood plank walkway, only open to pedestrians and cyclists, runs above the lanes of traffic. If you are not up for walking the whole distance, at least go as far as the first pillar, where there is a viewing platform, and you can see one of the granite towers up close. From the bridge are beautiful views over Manhattan, the East River, and beyond to the Statue of Liberty. Biking over the bridge is another option, but pedestrian traffic is often very heavy, and cycling can be slow and challenging on busy days. Be aware that the access to the bridge begins well back from the water's edge.
468
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Бруклинский мост
468
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The Brooklyn Bridge, with its Gothic-shaped arches and suspension cables, is one of the city's most recognizable landmarks and has inspired generations of poets, songwriters, and painters. This historic bridge, spanning the East River from Manhattan to Brooklyn, was completed in 1883 and was the world's first steel suspension bridge. You can see it from many of the ferries, or the east side of Manhattan, but the best way to experience this icon is to take an hour and walk across the Brooklyn Bridge. A wood plank walkway, only open to pedestrians and cyclists, runs above the lanes of traffic. If you are not up for walking the whole distance, at least go as far as the first pillar, where there is a viewing platform, and you can see one of the granite towers up close. From the bridge are beautiful views over Manhattan, the East River, and beyond to the Statue of Liberty. Biking over the bridge is another option, but pedestrian traffic is often very heavy, and cycling can be slow and challenging on busy days. Be aware that the access to the bridge begins well back from the water's edge.
One of the most famous shopping streets in America, Fifth Avenue is New York's premier shopping area, where many top designers have their flagship stores. Cartier, Tiffany, Bergdorf-Goodman, the famous Apple Store Fifth Avenue, and of course Saks Fifth Avenue, as well as many others line this posh avenue. Even non-shoppers can enjoy a walk along Fifth Avenue. The best area runs from approximately the south end of Central Park to the New York Public Library, or more specifically, between 60th Street and 40th Street.
8
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5th Avenue
8
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One of the most famous shopping streets in America, Fifth Avenue is New York's premier shopping area, where many top designers have their flagship stores. Cartier, Tiffany, Bergdorf-Goodman, the famous Apple Store Fifth Avenue, and of course Saks Fifth Avenue, as well as many others line this posh avenue. Even non-shoppers can enjoy a walk along Fifth Avenue. The best area runs from approximately the south end of Central Park to the New York Public Library, or more specifically, between 60th Street and 40th Street.
Grand Central Terminal, often called Grand Central Station, is a fantastic Beaux Arts building, and it's definitely worth popping in to take a look at this famous landmark. The building first opened in 1913 as a terminal for the subway and train stations. Outside, the 42nd Street colonnaded faces and the statuary on top are some of the key highlights. Inside, you can't miss the Grand Staircase, where you can stop to gaze out over the concourse. The beautifully restored ceiling here shows a celestial scene. You'll also find an extensive selection of retail shops and restaurants inside.
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Гранд Сентрал Стейшен
12
(рекомендации местных жителей)
Grand Central Terminal, often called Grand Central Station, is a fantastic Beaux Arts building, and it's definitely worth popping in to take a look at this famous landmark. The building first opened in 1913 as a terminal for the subway and train stations. Outside, the 42nd Street colonnaded faces and the statuary on top are some of the key highlights. Inside, you can't miss the Grand Staircase, where you can stop to gaze out over the concourse. The beautifully restored ceiling here shows a celestial scene. You'll also find an extensive selection of retail shops and restaurants inside.
At the top of the newly constructed One World Trade Center building, One World Observatory is an observation deck offering outstanding views from floors 100, 101, and 102, 1,776 feet above the city. The elevator to the top is part of the attraction. As you ascend, the surrounding panels show New York as it transformed over the years, from a rural landscape to the metropolis you see today. This glass building, which can be seen from all over the city, is a unique structure on the Manhattan skyline, with angles that give it a very distinct appearance. If you stand near the base and look straight up, the tower appears pyramidal. If you want to go up and see the view, you can buy a NYC One World Observatory Skip-the-Line Ticket to save you some time, but note, you will still need to clear security. Address: One World Trade Center, 285 Fulton Street, New York, New York
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One World Trade Center
285 Fulton Street
46
(рекомендации местных жителей)
At the top of the newly constructed One World Trade Center building, One World Observatory is an observation deck offering outstanding views from floors 100, 101, and 102, 1,776 feet above the city. The elevator to the top is part of the attraction. As you ascend, the surrounding panels show New York as it transformed over the years, from a rural landscape to the metropolis you see today. This glass building, which can be seen from all over the city, is a unique structure on the Manhattan skyline, with angles that give it a very distinct appearance. If you stand near the base and look straight up, the tower appears pyramidal. If you want to go up and see the view, you can buy a NYC One World Observatory Skip-the-Line Ticket to save you some time, but note, you will still need to clear security. Address: One World Trade Center, 285 Fulton Street, New York, New York
For ambience, the Frick Collection tops the list when it comes to New York City museums. Housed in an early 1900s mansion, the building and the original collection were donated by Henry Clay Frick, who had the mansion built to display his art collection. The artwork, which includes a mix of paintings, porcelain, and furniture, is beautifully laid out in sixteen galleries. On display are works by Monet, Rembrandt, Bellini, El Greco, and many other famous artists. The collections are not laid out according to period, artist, or country, but in a more random fashion designed for enjoyment. Rooms surround a beautiful covered Garden Court, with tropical plants and a central pond. Address: 1 East 70th Street, New York, New York
133
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The Frick Collection
1 E 70th St
133
(рекомендации местных жителей)
For ambience, the Frick Collection tops the list when it comes to New York City museums. Housed in an early 1900s mansion, the building and the original collection were donated by Henry Clay Frick, who had the mansion built to display his art collection. The artwork, which includes a mix of paintings, porcelain, and furniture, is beautifully laid out in sixteen galleries. On display are works by Monet, Rembrandt, Bellini, El Greco, and many other famous artists. The collections are not laid out according to period, artist, or country, but in a more random fashion designed for enjoyment. Rooms surround a beautiful covered Garden Court, with tropical plants and a central pond. Address: 1 East 70th Street, New York, New York
The New York Public Library's main branch was designed by architects, Carrere & Hastings, in the Beaux Arts style. The library, with its impressive rooms, is a prominent city attraction that has been featured in many movies and TV shows over the years. Although colloquially known as the main branch, the proper name is actually the Stephen A. Schwarzman building. It opened in 1911 to immediate acclaim. An enormous library, the Main Reading Room alone stretches two city blocks, and the Periodicals Room holds 10,000 current magazines. The collection at this location is vast, to say the least. Location: Fifth Avenue at 42nd Street, New York, New York
74
(рекомендации местных жителей)
Нью-Йоркская публичная библиотека
476 5th Avenue
74
(рекомендации местных жителей)
The New York Public Library's main branch was designed by architects, Carrere & Hastings, in the Beaux Arts style. The library, with its impressive rooms, is a prominent city attraction that has been featured in many movies and TV shows over the years. Although colloquially known as the main branch, the proper name is actually the Stephen A. Schwarzman building. It opened in 1911 to immediate acclaim. An enormous library, the Main Reading Room alone stretches two city blocks, and the Periodicals Room holds 10,000 current magazines. The collection at this location is vast, to say the least. Location: Fifth Avenue at 42nd Street, New York, New York
Stretching for eight city blocks from Broadway to South Street is the world famous Wall Street. This street and the surrounding area are home to some of the most important exchanges in the world, including the New York Stock Exchange, the NASDAQ, and the New York Mercantile Exchange. Also located nearby are the impressive Trinity Church and Federal Hall. Look for the bronze statue of Charging Bull at Bowling Green, on Broadway. This is one of the most popular tourist attractions in the Financial District and a popular photo opportunity for visitors.
Wall Street
Stretching for eight city blocks from Broadway to South Street is the world famous Wall Street. This street and the surrounding area are home to some of the most important exchanges in the world, including the New York Stock Exchange, the NASDAQ, and the New York Mercantile Exchange. Also located nearby are the impressive Trinity Church and Federal Hall. Look for the bronze statue of Charging Bull at Bowling Green, on Broadway. This is one of the most popular tourist attractions in the Financial District and a popular photo opportunity for visitors.
Lying in the shadow of Rockefeller Center is Radio City Music Hall, a famous entertainment venue and a designated city landmark. This 1932 Art Deco theater offers musical extravaganzas and films and is the home of the dance company, The Rockettes. The building was built and financed by the Rockefellers during the 1930s and contained the largest indoor theater in the world at the time. Today, the venue frequently hosts major events, including the Grammy Awards and Tony Awards. Its prominent marquee is hard to miss as it curves around the building and stretches down the block. Address: 1260 6th Avenue, New York, New York
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Радио-Сити-Мьюзик-холл
1260 6th Ave
75
(рекомендации местных жителей)
Lying in the shadow of Rockefeller Center is Radio City Music Hall, a famous entertainment venue and a designated city landmark. This 1932 Art Deco theater offers musical extravaganzas and films and is the home of the dance company, The Rockettes. The building was built and financed by the Rockefellers during the 1930s and contained the largest indoor theater in the world at the time. Today, the venue frequently hosts major events, including the Grammy Awards and Tony Awards. Its prominent marquee is hard to miss as it curves around the building and stretches down the block. Address: 1260 6th Avenue, New York, New York
St. Patrick's Cathedral is one of New York's finest examples of Gothic Revival, with its massive bronze doors, white marble facade, 330-foot spires, the Great Organ, rose window, bronze baldachin, 2,400 seating capacity, and the statue of Pieta at the side of the Lady Chapel. With millions of visitors annually, the cathedral is a major destination for believers and tourists alike. The building was erected in 1879 and has been carefully restored and maintained throughout its existence, including a $200-million renovation that was completed in 2016. Location: 5th Avenue, between 50th and 51st Streets, New York, New York
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Собор Святого Патрика
5th Avenue
56
(рекомендации местных жителей)
St. Patrick's Cathedral is one of New York's finest examples of Gothic Revival, with its massive bronze doors, white marble facade, 330-foot spires, the Great Organ, rose window, bronze baldachin, 2,400 seating capacity, and the statue of Pieta at the side of the Lady Chapel. With millions of visitors annually, the cathedral is a major destination for believers and tourists alike. The building was erected in 1879 and has been carefully restored and maintained throughout its existence, including a $200-million renovation that was completed in 2016. Location: 5th Avenue, between 50th and 51st Streets, New York, New York
Carnegie Hall opened in 1891 as New York's first great concert hall. Musicians from Tchaikovsky, who conducted on opening night, to Leonard Bernstein and The Beatles have filled the hall. It is said to have some of the best acoustics in the world. While the best way to enjoy the hall is to take in a performance, one of the best ways to learn about it is on a guided tour. The tour offers a comprehensive look at the hall, insight into the construction, and discusses some of the artists who have taken to the stage. Tours end at the Rose Museum. Address: 881 7th Ave, New York, New York
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Карнеги-холл
881 7th Avenue
39
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Carnegie Hall opened in 1891 as New York's first great concert hall. Musicians from Tchaikovsky, who conducted on opening night, to Leonard Bernstein and The Beatles have filled the hall. It is said to have some of the best acoustics in the world. While the best way to enjoy the hall is to take in a performance, one of the best ways to learn about it is on a guided tour. The tour offers a comprehensive look at the hall, insight into the construction, and discusses some of the artists who have taken to the stage. Tours end at the Rose Museum. Address: 881 7th Ave, New York, New York
On a summer's day, it's hard to beat a leisurely afternoon at Bryant Park. The grounds feature monuments and gardens, and "Le Carrousel," a popular carousel. A games area makes available chess boards, checkers, and backgammon boards for a small fee. Bryant Park was a seedy area known for crime and a hangout for undesirables until 1989, when the city reclaimed it and turned it into a beautiful urban oasis. Locals have embraced this park, and today, it's a pleasure to walk through. If you don't want to play a game, it is still interesting to watch others playing. The park is located adjacent to the New York Public Library. Location: Between W 40th Street and W 42nd Street, at 6th Ave, New York, New York
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Брайант-парк
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On a summer's day, it's hard to beat a leisurely afternoon at Bryant Park. The grounds feature monuments and gardens, and "Le Carrousel," a popular carousel. A games area makes available chess boards, checkers, and backgammon boards for a small fee. Bryant Park was a seedy area known for crime and a hangout for undesirables until 1989, when the city reclaimed it and turned it into a beautiful urban oasis. Locals have embraced this park, and today, it's a pleasure to walk through. If you don't want to play a game, it is still interesting to watch others playing. The park is located adjacent to the New York Public Library. Location: Between W 40th Street and W 42nd Street, at 6th Ave, New York, New York
Address 54 Pearl St. Date 1719 Where it gets its name Named for Samuel Fraunces, who owned and operated the place as the Queen’s Head Tavern during the 18th century and who was later President Washington’s chief steward. What it was before Throughout most of the 19th century, the main building was used as a boardinghouse; it was rescued from demolition in the early 1900s and largely reconstructed in 1907. Why it’s notable In one of the tavern’s rooms, George Washington bade a postwar farewell to his fellow officers; it also served as a meeting place for Revolutionaries before and during the war. What it is now Part museum and part drinking establishment, Fraunces Tavern has numerous places to sit for a pint and a pot pie. Though little of the original structure remains, the reconstructed corner building celebrates its history through portraits of Washington, early American flags and other mementos. Fast fact A tavern menu from 1914 shows an order of broiled lamb chops to cost 75 cents, a slice of huckleberry pie 15 cents and a glass of Ruppert’s Knickerbocker beer—a popular quaff of the times—10 cents.
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Fraunces Tavern
54 Pearl Street
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Address 54 Pearl St. Date 1719 Where it gets its name Named for Samuel Fraunces, who owned and operated the place as the Queen’s Head Tavern during the 18th century and who was later President Washington’s chief steward. What it was before Throughout most of the 19th century, the main building was used as a boardinghouse; it was rescued from demolition in the early 1900s and largely reconstructed in 1907. Why it’s notable In one of the tavern’s rooms, George Washington bade a postwar farewell to his fellow officers; it also served as a meeting place for Revolutionaries before and during the war. What it is now Part museum and part drinking establishment, Fraunces Tavern has numerous places to sit for a pint and a pot pie. Though little of the original structure remains, the reconstructed corner building celebrates its history through portraits of Washington, early American flags and other mementos. Fast fact A tavern menu from 1914 shows an order of broiled lamb chops to cost 75 cents, a slice of huckleberry pie 15 cents and a glass of Ruppert’s Knickerbocker beer—a popular quaff of the times—10 cents.
Address Whitehall Street and Broadway Date 1733, reconstructed 1978 Where it gets its name The park originally had a “bowling green,” or green space where the game “bowls” or “squares” would be played. What it was before Parade ground, marketplace and supposedly the site where Peter Minuit purchased the land of Manhattan from Native Americans. Why it’s notable Part of its iron fence, which dates back to 1771 and once served to protect an equestrian statue of King George, remains intact. The statue, on the other hand, was toppled at beginning of the Revolution; find a painting of that rebellious event at the New-York Historical Society. What it is now A public park—the oldest in the City—with a fountain at its center. Fast fact The bronze Charging Bull statue was originally dropped off underneath a downtown Christmas tree Mission Impossible–style, before finding its permanent Bowling Green home.
Bowling Green
Broadway
Address Whitehall Street and Broadway Date 1733, reconstructed 1978 Where it gets its name The park originally had a “bowling green,” or green space where the game “bowls” or “squares” would be played. What it was before Parade ground, marketplace and supposedly the site where Peter Minuit purchased the land of Manhattan from Native Americans. Why it’s notable Part of its iron fence, which dates back to 1771 and once served to protect an equestrian statue of King George, remains intact. The statue, on the other hand, was toppled at beginning of the Revolution; find a painting of that rebellious event at the New-York Historical Society. What it is now A public park—the oldest in the City—with a fountain at its center. Fast fact The bronze Charging Bull statue was originally dropped off underneath a downtown Christmas tree Mission Impossible–style, before finding its permanent Bowling Green home.
Address The Battery Date 1811 Where it gets its name From DeWitt Clinton, the early 19th-century mayor of New York City (as well as New York governor and failed Federalist presidential candidate). What it was before A fort called Southwest Battery, which had successive stints as an immigration holding center, the New York City Aquarium, a restaurant and opera house. Why it’s notable During the War of 1812, the fort—along with three others in the harbor—was heavily armed to protect against British naval advances. What it is now The curved, sandstone building down in the Battery is the place to depart for ferries to the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island; the National Parks Service which operates Castle Clinton, runs brief guided tours of the building and its grounds. Fast fact Despite its active presence during wartime, no shots were ever fired from, or on, Castle Clinton.
Castle Clinton National Monument
Address The Battery Date 1811 Where it gets its name From DeWitt Clinton, the early 19th-century mayor of New York City (as well as New York governor and failed Federalist presidential candidate). What it was before A fort called Southwest Battery, which had successive stints as an immigration holding center, the New York City Aquarium, a restaurant and opera house. Why it’s notable During the War of 1812, the fort—along with three others in the harbor—was heavily armed to protect against British naval advances. What it is now The curved, sandstone building down in the Battery is the place to depart for ferries to the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island; the National Parks Service which operates Castle Clinton, runs brief guided tours of the building and its grounds. Fast fact Despite its active presence during wartime, no shots were ever fired from, or on, Castle Clinton.
Address 26 Wall St. Date 1842 Where it gets its name It was on this spot on Wall Street that the original Federal Hall, built in 1700 as a city hall and later serving as the nation’s initial capitol building, stood. What is was before The same building once served as the US Customs House and US Sub-Treasury Building Why it’s notable The site—though not this building—is where George Washington was sworn in as the first president of the United States. The current Greek revival temple, lined by Corinthian columns, bears some resemblance to its predecessor. What it is now A National Parks Service–operated museum with artifacts like the bible Washington swore his oath on and memorabilia from the trial of John Peter Zenger, who dared to criticize the British royal governor of New York. Tours are available on weekdays. Fast fact The bronze statue of Washington that fronts the building is 12 feet tall; a 2-foot cast of John Quincy Adams Ward’s sculpture can be found at the Met Fifth Avenue.
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Federal Hall
26 Wall Street
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Address 26 Wall St. Date 1842 Where it gets its name It was on this spot on Wall Street that the original Federal Hall, built in 1700 as a city hall and later serving as the nation’s initial capitol building, stood. What is was before The same building once served as the US Customs House and US Sub-Treasury Building Why it’s notable The site—though not this building—is where George Washington was sworn in as the first president of the United States. The current Greek revival temple, lined by Corinthian columns, bears some resemblance to its predecessor. What it is now A National Parks Service–operated museum with artifacts like the bible Washington swore his oath on and memorabilia from the trial of John Peter Zenger, who dared to criticize the British royal governor of New York. Tours are available on weekdays. Fast fact The bronze statue of Washington that fronts the building is 12 feet tall; a 2-foot cast of John Quincy Adams Ward’s sculpture can be found at the Met Fifth Avenue.
Address 75 Broadway Date 1846 Where it gets its name It’s a common name for churches the world over. What it was before Two other Trinity Churches have stood here. One burned down during the Revolutionary War; the other was demolished in 1839 after weathering storm damage. Why it’s notable The brownstone church was built with a spire whose cross topped out at 281 feet, a towering presence in the skyline in the mid-1800s—and much of the rest of that century. The churchyard cemetery, which predates the current church, holds the graves of Alexander Hamilton, Hamilton’s wife Elizabeth Schuyler, Declaration of Independence signer Francis Lewis and early publisher William Bradford. What it is now It remains an active Episcopal parish with daily services, though many come here for afternoon guided tours that point out architectural and historical elements of the church. Fast fact Thanks to a land grant from Queen Anne in 1705, Trinity Church is one of NYC’s biggest landowners—its holdings were valued a couple of years back at $2 billion.
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Trinity Church
75 Broadway
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Address 75 Broadway Date 1846 Where it gets its name It’s a common name for churches the world over. What it was before Two other Trinity Churches have stood here. One burned down during the Revolutionary War; the other was demolished in 1839 after weathering storm damage. Why it’s notable The brownstone church was built with a spire whose cross topped out at 281 feet, a towering presence in the skyline in the mid-1800s—and much of the rest of that century. The churchyard cemetery, which predates the current church, holds the graves of Alexander Hamilton, Hamilton’s wife Elizabeth Schuyler, Declaration of Independence signer Francis Lewis and early publisher William Bradford. What it is now It remains an active Episcopal parish with daily services, though many come here for afternoon guided tours that point out architectural and historical elements of the church. Fast fact Thanks to a land grant from Queen Anne in 1705, Trinity Church is one of NYC’s biggest landowners—its holdings were valued a couple of years back at $2 billion.
Address 8 Broad St. Date 1903 Where it gets its name The exchange dates back to the so-called Buttonwood Agreement from 1792, when a group of merchants met under a buttonwood tree and consented to deal with just one another and take fixed commissions in deals; 25 years later an expanded group officially ratified itself as the New York Stock & Exchange Board. Where it was before 40 Wall Street and 10-12 Broad Street. Why it’s notable More shares are exchanged here than at any other market in the world. The current location is a columned temple with a classical frieze on its pediment where a central female figure, Integrity, is flanked by representations of industry and production. What it is now Still the floor where stocks are traded, but off-limits to public visitation since 9/11. Fast fact There are multiple stock exchanges in Lower Manhattan, including the Mercantile Exchange over in Brookfield Place and Nasdaq at One Liberty Plaza (see below).
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Нью-Йоркская фондовая биржа
11 Wall Street
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Address 8 Broad St. Date 1903 Where it gets its name The exchange dates back to the so-called Buttonwood Agreement from 1792, when a group of merchants met under a buttonwood tree and consented to deal with just one another and take fixed commissions in deals; 25 years later an expanded group officially ratified itself as the New York Stock & Exchange Board. Where it was before 40 Wall Street and 10-12 Broad Street. Why it’s notable More shares are exchanged here than at any other market in the world. The current location is a columned temple with a classical frieze on its pediment where a central female figure, Integrity, is flanked by representations of industry and production. What it is now Still the floor where stocks are traded, but off-limits to public visitation since 9/11. Fast fact There are multiple stock exchanges in Lower Manhattan, including the Mercantile Exchange over in Brookfield Place and Nasdaq at One Liberty Plaza (see below).
Address 8 Spruce St. Date 2010 Where it gets its name From its architect, Frank Gehry, who is one of the best-known designers of modern spaces. What it was before A parking lot. Why it’s notable Besides being one of the City’s tallest residential towers at 76 stories and having a design that suggests a building rippling in the wind, it helped punctuate Lower Manhattan’s post-9/11 comeback. Fast fact At the base of the building is a New York City public school, PS 397, which has around 500 kids between pre-kindergarten and seventh grade.
New York by Gehry
8 Spruce Street
Address 8 Spruce St. Date 2010 Where it gets its name From its architect, Frank Gehry, who is one of the best-known designers of modern spaces. What it was before A parking lot. Why it’s notable Besides being one of the City’s tallest residential towers at 76 stories and having a design that suggests a building rippling in the wind, it helped punctuate Lower Manhattan’s post-9/11 comeback. Fast fact At the base of the building is a New York City public school, PS 397, which has around 500 kids between pre-kindergarten and seventh grade.
Designed by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux—the visionary designers behind Central Park—Prospect Park offers Brooklynites a chance to get back in touch with nature. Soak up the sunshine in the sprawling Long Meadow, take a guided hike to forage for wild herbs or explore the Ravine, one of the few remaining indigenous forests in the city.
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Парк Проспект
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Designed by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux—the visionary designers behind Central Park—Prospect Park offers Brooklynites a chance to get back in touch with nature. Soak up the sunshine in the sprawling Long Meadow, take a guided hike to forage for wild herbs or explore the Ravine, one of the few remaining indigenous forests in the city.
One of Kings County’s preeminent cultural institutions, this 560,000-square-foot venue made history as the first American museum to exhibit African objects as artwork. In addition to the more than 4,000 items in the Egyptian holdings, museumgoers can scope pieces by masters such as Cézanne, Monet and Degas, plus an entire center devoted to feminist art. (The venue is the permanent home of Judy Chicago’s massive installation The Dinner Party.)
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Бруклинский музей
200 Eastern Pkwy
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One of Kings County’s preeminent cultural institutions, this 560,000-square-foot venue made history as the first American museum to exhibit African objects as artwork. In addition to the more than 4,000 items in the Egyptian holdings, museumgoers can scope pieces by masters such as Cézanne, Monet and Degas, plus an entire center devoted to feminist art. (The venue is the permanent home of Judy Chicago’s massive installation The Dinner Party.)
This market has elevated the vintage-shopping experience, setting a new standard for both goods and food vendors, and emphasizing local purveyors where possible. Its mini empire now includes markets in DUMBO and Industry City at Sunset Park, as well as two food-focused Smorgasburg outposts. It’s as good a people-watching spot as you’ll find—plenty of established and wanna-be designers mill about—and the eats alone are worth the trip.
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Brooklyn Flea
80 Pearl St
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This market has elevated the vintage-shopping experience, setting a new standard for both goods and food vendors, and emphasizing local purveyors where possible. Its mini empire now includes markets in DUMBO and Industry City at Sunset Park, as well as two food-focused Smorgasburg outposts. It’s as good a people-watching spot as you’ll find—plenty of established and wanna-be designers mill about—and the eats alone are worth the trip.
Those searching for a little peace and quiet would do well to spend a few hours at this verdant oasis. The garden, which abuts two other neighborhood gems—The Brooklyn Museum and Prospect Park—was founded in 1910 and features hundreds of types of flora, laid out over 52 acres. Each spring, crowds descend on the space for the Sakura Matsuri Festival, during which hundreds of trees bloom along the Cherry Esplanade.
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Бруклинский ботанический сад
990 Washington Avenue
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Those searching for a little peace and quiet would do well to spend a few hours at this verdant oasis. The garden, which abuts two other neighborhood gems—The Brooklyn Museum and Prospect Park—was founded in 1910 and features hundreds of types of flora, laid out over 52 acres. Each spring, crowds descend on the space for the Sakura Matsuri Festival, during which hundreds of trees bloom along the Cherry Esplanade.
In order to mollify the residents of Brooklyn Heights, city planner Robert Moses built this park atop the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway to muffle the street noise when when it opened in 1950. Today, you might forget that traffic is moving along beneath you while strolling the esplanade. The picture-perfect views of Manhattan, the Brooklyn Bridge and the Statue of Liberty are admittedly distracting.
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Brooklyn Heights
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In order to mollify the residents of Brooklyn Heights, city planner Robert Moses built this park atop the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway to muffle the street noise when when it opened in 1950. Today, you might forget that traffic is moving along beneath you while strolling the esplanade. The picture-perfect views of Manhattan, the Brooklyn Bridge and the Statue of Liberty are admittedly distracting.
This historic wooden coaster dates back to 1927, during Coney Island’s glory days. Now a national historic landmark and part of the new Luna Park, the Cyclone still thrills riders every spring and summer. After you’ve gotten your fill of the amusement park, don’t forget to grab a beer and hot dog from the original Nathan’s Famous.
The Cyclone Roller Coaster Coney Island NY
801 Riegelmann Boardwalk
This historic wooden coaster dates back to 1927, during Coney Island’s glory days. Now a national historic landmark and part of the new Luna Park, the Cyclone still thrills riders every spring and summer. After you’ve gotten your fill of the amusement park, don’t forget to grab a beer and hot dog from the original Nathan’s Famous.
BAM, which showcases local and out-of-town companies, is one of New York’s most prominent cultural institutions. The Howard Gilman Opera House, with its Federal-style columns and carved marble, is a beautiful dance venue. Each fall, BAM’s Next Wave Festival highlights established and experimental dance groups; in the spring, there’s an assortment of African and modern dance and ballet.
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BAM Fisher
321 Ashland Place
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BAM, which showcases local and out-of-town companies, is one of New York’s most prominent cultural institutions. The Howard Gilman Opera House, with its Federal-style columns and carved marble, is a beautiful dance venue. Each fall, BAM’s Next Wave Festival highlights established and experimental dance groups; in the spring, there’s an assortment of African and modern dance and ballet.
At New York's one and only aquarium, see a living re-creation of the Pacific coastline, and catch sight of various East River Species, plus some truly awesome sharks and sea jellies. Fantasize about extending your summer as you visit Glover's Reef, a 150,000-gallon tank stocked with 35 species—give or take—of marine life from the coast of Belize, including jawfish and moray eels.
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Нью-Йоркский аквариум
602 Surf Avenue
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At New York's one and only aquarium, see a living re-creation of the Pacific coastline, and catch sight of various East River Species, plus some truly awesome sharks and sea jellies. Fantasize about extending your summer as you visit Glover's Reef, a 150,000-gallon tank stocked with 35 species—give or take—of marine life from the coast of Belize, including jawfish and moray eels.
Located in a former military residence on the grounds of the Brooklyn Navy Yard, this small museum chronicles the mighty history of the former shipbuilding center—which, at its peak during World War II, employed close to 70,000 people. Take a deep dive into the area’s history from Native American origins to the Industrial Revolution at the museum’s permanent exhibit or board a weekend bus tour of the 300-acre yard.
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Building 92
63 Flushing Avenue
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Located in a former military residence on the grounds of the Brooklyn Navy Yard, this small museum chronicles the mighty history of the former shipbuilding center—which, at its peak during World War II, employed close to 70,000 people. Take a deep dive into the area’s history from Native American origins to the Industrial Revolution at the museum’s permanent exhibit or board a weekend bus tour of the 300-acre yard.
Unlike the sprawling meadows of Prospect Park, Brooklyn Bridge Park wasn’t built to replicate the area’s serene natural environment. Instead, the park transformed a defunct shipping and storage complex into an urban playground complete with terraces, picnic areas and athletic fields. Don’t leave without a ride on Jane’s Carousel, the park’s beautifully restored 1920’s merry-go-round.
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Парк Бруклин Бридж
334 Furman St
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Unlike the sprawling meadows of Prospect Park, Brooklyn Bridge Park wasn’t built to replicate the area’s serene natural environment. Instead, the park transformed a defunct shipping and storage complex into an urban playground complete with terraces, picnic areas and athletic fields. Don’t leave without a ride on Jane’s Carousel, the park’s beautifully restored 1920’s merry-go-round.
Founded in 1838 as a rural cemetery in Greenwood Heights, this site was inspired by the Pére Lachaise Cemetery in Paris and Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Having vied with Niagara Falls as New York State’s greatest tourist attraction, it gained landmark status in 1966. Filled with Victorian mausoleums, cherubs and gargoyles, Green-Wood is the resting place of some half-million New Yorkers, including Jean-Michel Basquiat, Leonard Bernstein and Boss Tweed. But there’s more to do here than grave-spot: Check out the massive Gothic arch at the main entrance or climb to the top of Battle Hill, a pivotal spot during the Battle of Brooklyn in 1776.
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Кладбище Грин-Вуд
500 25th Street
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Founded in 1838 as a rural cemetery in Greenwood Heights, this site was inspired by the Pére Lachaise Cemetery in Paris and Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Having vied with Niagara Falls as New York State’s greatest tourist attraction, it gained landmark status in 1966. Filled with Victorian mausoleums, cherubs and gargoyles, Green-Wood is the resting place of some half-million New Yorkers, including Jean-Michel Basquiat, Leonard Bernstein and Boss Tweed. But there’s more to do here than grave-spot: Check out the massive Gothic arch at the main entrance or climb to the top of Battle Hill, a pivotal spot during the Battle of Brooklyn in 1776.
At this interactive wildlife center, kids can walk along the Discovery Trail and come face to face with Oggie and his new pal Dixie, two North American river otters. Keep hopping down the path to find the Australian Walkabout's kangaroo and the new rock wallabies, whose grooved hind paws easily grip the boulders in their steep habitat. A pair of native South African owls—recognizable by their bright white faces—roost in the aviary along the trail. On spring days, you might also find a commotion at the sea lion court: the graceful swimmers like to entertain onlookers by diving, high-fiving their keepers and chowing down on fishy food.
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Зоопарк Проспект Парк
450 Flatbush Avenue
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At this interactive wildlife center, kids can walk along the Discovery Trail and come face to face with Oggie and his new pal Dixie, two North American river otters. Keep hopping down the path to find the Australian Walkabout's kangaroo and the new rock wallabies, whose grooved hind paws easily grip the boulders in their steep habitat. A pair of native South African owls—recognizable by their bright white faces—roost in the aviary along the trail. On spring days, you might also find a commotion at the sea lion court: the graceful swimmers like to entertain onlookers by diving, high-fiving their keepers and chowing down on fishy food.
The historic Brooklyn Navy Yard was a working naval shipyard up until 1979. Now the yard is home to Rooftop Reds, Kings County Distillery, Brooklyn Grange, and a must-visit museum, BLDG 92, dedicated to its history is open on weekends with public tours, educational programs, and archives. Check out the Brooklyn Navy Yard's event page, which has everything from bicycle tours to trivia nights.
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Бруклин Нейви Ярд
63 Flushing Avenue
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The historic Brooklyn Navy Yard was a working naval shipyard up until 1979. Now the yard is home to Rooftop Reds, Kings County Distillery, Brooklyn Grange, and a must-visit museum, BLDG 92, dedicated to its history is open on weekends with public tours, educational programs, and archives. Check out the Brooklyn Navy Yard's event page, which has everything from bicycle tours to trivia nights.
This unique museum housed in a decommissioned subway station in downtown Brooklyn has a collection of vintage subway cars. You'll feel as if you stepped into a time machine as you peruse the cars dating back to 1907. The museum tells the stories and history of mass transportation in New York City through their exhibits and collection of memorabilia. If you have kids in tow, be sure to attend one of the many public programs for children. They also host tours, art programs, and other events at the museum. Don't forget to allot time for a visit to the gift shop, which has some of the best NYC transit-themed souvenirs.
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New York Transit Museum
99 Boerum Place
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This unique museum housed in a decommissioned subway station in downtown Brooklyn has a collection of vintage subway cars. You'll feel as if you stepped into a time machine as you peruse the cars dating back to 1907. The museum tells the stories and history of mass transportation in New York City through their exhibits and collection of memorabilia. If you have kids in tow, be sure to attend one of the many public programs for children. They also host tours, art programs, and other events at the museum. Don't forget to allot time for a visit to the gift shop, which has some of the best NYC transit-themed souvenirs.
Lakeside is the largest and most ambitious project in Prospect Park since its creation nearly 150 years ago. Spanning 26 acres, this $74 million restoration by the Prospect Park Alliance transformed the southeast corner of the Park into a popular scenic and recreational destination. Lakeside offers year-round seasonal activities, dining, and special events. From ice skating on our two outdoor winter rinks to cooling off in our summer Splash Pad to exploring the Park on boats and bikes, Lakeside is Brooklyn’s premier recreational destination. Bluestone Lakeside Cafe offers indoor and outdoor seating set against a panoramic view of Lakeside’s rinks and Prospect Park Lake. Bluestone features a distinctive menu with a full spectrum of dining options, from light bites to hearty and healthy chef-inspired sandwiches and desserts.
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LeFrak Center at Lakeside Prospect Park Brooklyn
171 East Drive
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Lakeside is the largest and most ambitious project in Prospect Park since its creation nearly 150 years ago. Spanning 26 acres, this $74 million restoration by the Prospect Park Alliance transformed the southeast corner of the Park into a popular scenic and recreational destination. Lakeside offers year-round seasonal activities, dining, and special events. From ice skating on our two outdoor winter rinks to cooling off in our summer Splash Pad to exploring the Park on boats and bikes, Lakeside is Brooklyn’s premier recreational destination. Bluestone Lakeside Cafe offers indoor and outdoor seating set against a panoramic view of Lakeside’s rinks and Prospect Park Lake. Bluestone features a distinctive menu with a full spectrum of dining options, from light bites to hearty and healthy chef-inspired sandwiches and desserts.
The ideal spot to entertain the kiddies on cold winter weekends, Puppetworks has been successfully showcasing puppet shows of classic tales since 1980. Nick Coppola, the founder of Puppetworks, Inc., was awarded the 2011 President’s Award for ‘Outstanding Contributions to the Art of Puppetry’ and for a puppet theater permanently built at Macy’s Herald Square dedicated to the company’s holiday tradition. Currently playing at the Park Slope historic district’s site, Beauty and the Beast is performed every weekend during noon and afternoon hours for a children and adults. Puppetworks can also be found at The Morgan Library with a rendition of The Steadfast Tin Soldier on Sunday, December 6. Upcoming puppet shows include The Nutcracker Suite, Goldilocks and the Three Bears, Alice in Wonderland, and The Wizard of Oz.
Puppet Works
338 6th Ave
The ideal spot to entertain the kiddies on cold winter weekends, Puppetworks has been successfully showcasing puppet shows of classic tales since 1980. Nick Coppola, the founder of Puppetworks, Inc., was awarded the 2011 President’s Award for ‘Outstanding Contributions to the Art of Puppetry’ and for a puppet theater permanently built at Macy’s Herald Square dedicated to the company’s holiday tradition. Currently playing at the Park Slope historic district’s site, Beauty and the Beast is performed every weekend during noon and afternoon hours for a children and adults. Puppetworks can also be found at The Morgan Library with a rendition of The Steadfast Tin Soldier on Sunday, December 6. Upcoming puppet shows include The Nutcracker Suite, Goldilocks and the Three Bears, Alice in Wonderland, and The Wizard of Oz.