Пропустить и перейти к тексту

Ταξιδιωτικός οδηγός του/της Ευαγγελία

Ευαγγελία
Ευαγγελία
На Airbnb с 2017
Ευαγγελία

Ταξιδιωτικός οδηγός του/της Ευαγγελία

Αξιοθέατα
On the 12th Km of the main road linking the capital city of Naxos (Chora), with the inland, the Bazeos Tower dominates the land leading to the seacoast of Agiassos. The tower dates back to the 17th century. At first, this tower functioned as a monastery and was called monastery of the Holy Cross (“Timios Stavros”). By the end of the 19th century, the tower was bought by the Bazeos (Baseggio) family, whose descendants are the current owners. Since 2001, when the first renovation phase was completed, the monument remains open to the public through the Naxos Festival activities which take place here every summer. In nowadays the tower is one of the most well-known and popular monuments of Naxos.
10
(рекомендации местных жителей)
Bazeos Tower
10
(рекомендации местных жителей)
On the 12th Km of the main road linking the capital city of Naxos (Chora), with the inland, the Bazeos Tower dominates the land leading to the seacoast of Agiassos. The tower dates back to the 17th century. At first, this tower functioned as a monastery and was called monastery of the Holy Cross (“Timios Stavros”). By the end of the 19th century, the tower was bought by the Bazeos (Baseggio) family, whose descendants are the current owners. Since 2001, when the first renovation phase was completed, the monument remains open to the public through the Naxos Festival activities which take place here every summer. In nowadays the tower is one of the most well-known and popular monuments of Naxos.
One of Naxos’s two main marble quarrying areas in antiquity is located in the greater Flerio area (the other is in the area of Apollonas). The locale is replete with remnants of quarrying activity (wedge-slots, rectangular wedge holes, series of small circular holes made with chisel, abounding marble rubble) but the main attraction is the two oversized but incomplete freestanding stone figures of unclothed young men (Kouroi), dating to the early 6th century BC. In antiquity works of such size would initially undergo rough processing at the quarry –to prevent damage of the finished surface during transportation- and be completed at their destination. In both cases of the Kouroi of Naxos accidents evidently occurred during their transportation from the slopes of the quarry down to the stream because limbs of the statues were broken (the legs of the Kouros at Faraggi and the right foot of the Kouros at Flerio), causing them to be abandoned. The failed projects paint a vivid picture of the difficulties and duress suffered by the quarriers of the day, who sought consolation and spiritual support in Otus and Ephialtes –the giant twin deities worshiped at the nearby sanctuary of Flerio springs.
11
(рекомендации местных жителей)
Kouros at Melanes
11
(рекомендации местных жителей)
One of Naxos’s two main marble quarrying areas in antiquity is located in the greater Flerio area (the other is in the area of Apollonas). The locale is replete with remnants of quarrying activity (wedge-slots, rectangular wedge holes, series of small circular holes made with chisel, abounding marble rubble) but the main attraction is the two oversized but incomplete freestanding stone figures of unclothed young men (Kouroi), dating to the early 6th century BC. In antiquity works of such size would initially undergo rough processing at the quarry –to prevent damage of the finished surface during transportation- and be completed at their destination. In both cases of the Kouroi of Naxos accidents evidently occurred during their transportation from the slopes of the quarry down to the stream because limbs of the statues were broken (the legs of the Kouros at Faraggi and the right foot of the Kouros at Flerio), causing them to be abandoned. The failed projects paint a vivid picture of the difficulties and duress suffered by the quarriers of the day, who sought consolation and spiritual support in Otus and Ephialtes –the giant twin deities worshiped at the nearby sanctuary of Flerio springs.
The most impressive sight in the ancient quarry of Apollonas on Naxos is a huge, half-finished statue, known as the Kouros of the god Apollo. The statue, lying in supine position and longer than 10m, dates to the 6th century BC and archaeologists differ on whether it represents Apollo or the god Dionysus. The fact that construction of the giant temple of Apollo at Portara, the position overlooking the present-day port of Naxos, is considered to have started in the same period as the date of the statue, has raised questions whether the Kouros was somehow linked with the temple. The statue was never finished, but it is unclear whether this was because it broke and a repair was impossible, or because its completion was cancelled, or because it was never paid for. Directions for accessThe Kouros statue is very near the village of Apollonas and is accessed via a footpath.
13
(рекомендации местных жителей)
Apollonas Kouros
13
(рекомендации местных жителей)
The most impressive sight in the ancient quarry of Apollonas on Naxos is a huge, half-finished statue, known as the Kouros of the god Apollo. The statue, lying in supine position and longer than 10m, dates to the 6th century BC and archaeologists differ on whether it represents Apollo or the god Dionysus. The fact that construction of the giant temple of Apollo at Portara, the position overlooking the present-day port of Naxos, is considered to have started in the same period as the date of the statue, has raised questions whether the Kouros was somehow linked with the temple. The statue was never finished, but it is unclear whether this was because it broke and a repair was impossible, or because its completion was cancelled, or because it was never paid for. Directions for accessThe Kouros statue is very near the village of Apollonas and is accessed via a footpath.
Naxos’ Temple of Apollo – Portara, a huge marble gate and the single remaining part of an unfinished temple of Apollo of 530 BC, is the island’s emblem and main landmark. Standing on the islet of Palatia, at the entrance to Naxos harbor, it comprises four marble parts weighing about 20 tons each. Its construction was initiated by the tyrant Lygdamis in the 6th century BC, according to the specifications of the temples of Olympic Zeus in Athens and of the goddess Hera on Samos. It measured 59m in length and 28m in width, and its entrance was on the western side of Naxos –an unusual feature for an Ionian-style temple. The monumental gate seen today, which led from the vestibule to the main part of the temple, lies amidst traces of its foundations and those of a peripheral colonnade that was never completed. An arched Christian church was built on the ruins in the 6th or 7th century. The islet of Palatia has been associated with the worship of Ariadne — a Cretan princess — and Dionysus, the god of wine and merriment. Because, according to mythology, Dionysus abducted the princess at the beachside of Palatia, the islet is considered the place where Dionysian festivities were first held. Naxos’ Temple of Apollo – Portara today is connected with the Naxos mainland via a paved footpath. The spot offers one of the most enchanting sunsets in Greece.
28
(рекомендации местных жителей)
Apollo temple
28
(рекомендации местных жителей)
Naxos’ Temple of Apollo – Portara, a huge marble gate and the single remaining part of an unfinished temple of Apollo of 530 BC, is the island’s emblem and main landmark. Standing on the islet of Palatia, at the entrance to Naxos harbor, it comprises four marble parts weighing about 20 tons each. Its construction was initiated by the tyrant Lygdamis in the 6th century BC, according to the specifications of the temples of Olympic Zeus in Athens and of the goddess Hera on Samos. It measured 59m in length and 28m in width, and its entrance was on the western side of Naxos –an unusual feature for an Ionian-style temple. The monumental gate seen today, which led from the vestibule to the main part of the temple, lies amidst traces of its foundations and those of a peripheral colonnade that was never completed. An arched Christian church was built on the ruins in the 6th or 7th century. The islet of Palatia has been associated with the worship of Ariadne — a Cretan princess — and Dionysus, the god of wine and merriment. Because, according to mythology, Dionysus abducted the princess at the beachside of Palatia, the islet is considered the place where Dionysian festivities were first held. Naxos’ Temple of Apollo – Portara today is connected with the Naxos mainland via a paved footpath. The spot offers one of the most enchanting sunsets in Greece.
One of the most important sanctuaries of ancient Naxos, dedicated to the god Dionysus and possibly a female deity of nature, was operated at Yria, south of Naxos town and in the middle of the fertile valley of Livadi, between the 14th century BC (Mycenean era) and the Roman period. Worship was conducted outdoors up until the Middle Geometric period (850-750 BC), when four sequential buildings were constructed with the same orientation. These were designed to serve the permanent and growing needs of the faithful in an area whose swampy geomorphology presented particular difficulties. The last of all buildings at the site, a monumental temple constructed around 580 BC (Archaic period), has been restored in the framework of a joint research program involving the University of Athens and Technical University Munich. The Yria temples on Naxos provide unique and full evidence of the birth of Greek marble island architecture. This temple was converted into a Christian basilica in the 5th or 6th century AD. Frequent floods, however, caused it to be abandoned and worship was transferred to the neighboring church of Agios Georgios. The complex included a restaurant for the faithful. Its initial construction phase dates to the early Archaic period and it was replaced by larger buildings during the Classical and Roman periods. A limited sample of the movable finds found after a long excavation in the area is exhibited in the building of the Museum Collection. Vassilis K. Lamprinoudakis Open daily except Monday 08:30 – 15:00 22850 42325, 22850 22725 22850 227285 Free entrance
Temple of DIONYSUS, Iria
One of the most important sanctuaries of ancient Naxos, dedicated to the god Dionysus and possibly a female deity of nature, was operated at Yria, south of Naxos town and in the middle of the fertile valley of Livadi, between the 14th century BC (Mycenean era) and the Roman period. Worship was conducted outdoors up until the Middle Geometric period (850-750 BC), when four sequential buildings were constructed with the same orientation. These were designed to serve the permanent and growing needs of the faithful in an area whose swampy geomorphology presented particular difficulties. The last of all buildings at the site, a monumental temple constructed around 580 BC (Archaic period), has been restored in the framework of a joint research program involving the University of Athens and Technical University Munich. The Yria temples on Naxos provide unique and full evidence of the birth of Greek marble island architecture. This temple was converted into a Christian basilica in the 5th or 6th century AD. Frequent floods, however, caused it to be abandoned and worship was transferred to the neighboring church of Agios Georgios. The complex included a restaurant for the faithful. Its initial construction phase dates to the early Archaic period and it was replaced by larger buildings during the Classical and Roman periods. A limited sample of the movable finds found after a long excavation in the area is exhibited in the building of the Museum Collection. Vassilis K. Lamprinoudakis Open daily except Monday 08:30 – 15:00 22850 42325, 22850 22725 22850 227285 Free entrance
The Ursuline School -School of Commerce on Naxos island was initially a monastery for Jesuit monks who settled on Naxos in the early 17th century, guided by French diplomacy and foreign policy in the Levant. The Jesuits assumed the task of establishing a school for the religious and social education of Naxos‘ young Catholics. They went on to acquire a significant amount of property on Naxos, and are believed to have introduced oranges to the island, at their resort in the Kalamitsia area, near Melanes. The Ursuline School on Naxos operated without interruption under the Jesuits from 1628 to 1773 when, following initiatives by King Louis XVI of France, administration was transferred to the monks of the religious order of Saint Lazare (Lazaristes) –until 1887, when they departed from Naxos. Salesian monks assumed control of the Ursuline School in 1891 and organized it on modern standards, converting it into a School of Commerce. The celebrated Greek writer and philosopher Nikos Kazantzakis studied at this school as a teenager in 1898. The school gained huge fame but eventually had to close down, permanently, in 1927, three-hundred years after its establishment. The Ursuline School on Naxos began operating in 1739, but efforts to establish a girl school were first made a century earlier, by Frenchman Robert Saulger, the Jesuit superior at Naxos. The property was purchased by the Greek state in 1986 and has since served as a cultural institution. Today, the building serves as a contemporary venue for meetings, conferences, exhibitions and other events.
7
(рекомендации местных жителей)
Castle Of Naxos (Kastro)
7
(рекомендации местных жителей)
The Ursuline School -School of Commerce on Naxos island was initially a monastery for Jesuit monks who settled on Naxos in the early 17th century, guided by French diplomacy and foreign policy in the Levant. The Jesuits assumed the task of establishing a school for the religious and social education of Naxos‘ young Catholics. They went on to acquire a significant amount of property on Naxos, and are believed to have introduced oranges to the island, at their resort in the Kalamitsia area, near Melanes. The Ursuline School on Naxos operated without interruption under the Jesuits from 1628 to 1773 when, following initiatives by King Louis XVI of France, administration was transferred to the monks of the religious order of Saint Lazare (Lazaristes) –until 1887, when they departed from Naxos. Salesian monks assumed control of the Ursuline School in 1891 and organized it on modern standards, converting it into a School of Commerce. The celebrated Greek writer and philosopher Nikos Kazantzakis studied at this school as a teenager in 1898. The school gained huge fame but eventually had to close down, permanently, in 1927, three-hundred years after its establishment. The Ursuline School on Naxos began operating in 1739, but efforts to establish a girl school were first made a century earlier, by Frenchman Robert Saulger, the Jesuit superior at Naxos. The property was purchased by the Greek state in 1986 and has since served as a cultural institution. Today, the building serves as a contemporary venue for meetings, conferences, exhibitions and other events.
The Catholic Cathedral, located in Naxos’ Kastro in the Old Town, was built in the medieval era. It went through various construction phases before taking its final shape in the 17th century. Its marble floor is richly decorated with 17th and 18th century memorial stones depicting the family crests of some of the most prominent Catholic families that were active on Naxos from the 16th century onwards. A double-sided icon, depicting Virgin Mary and St. John the Baptist, stands amidst an abundance of baroque-style décor in the central podium. Dated back to the 12th century, it is older than the cathedral itself. Other icons reveal the fusion of Byzantine and western styles under the influence of the Venetian-Cretan school, from which the celebrated artist and architect El Greco, born Domenikos Theotokopoulos,emerged.
Catholic Church - Kaθολικη Μητροπολη
The Catholic Cathedral, located in Naxos’ Kastro in the Old Town, was built in the medieval era. It went through various construction phases before taking its final shape in the 17th century. Its marble floor is richly decorated with 17th and 18th century memorial stones depicting the family crests of some of the most prominent Catholic families that were active on Naxos from the 16th century onwards. A double-sided icon, depicting Virgin Mary and St. John the Baptist, stands amidst an abundance of baroque-style décor in the central podium. Dated back to the 12th century, it is older than the cathedral itself. Other icons reveal the fusion of Byzantine and western styles under the influence of the Venetian-Cretan school, from which the celebrated artist and architect El Greco, born Domenikos Theotokopoulos,emerged.